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(AP Photo/The Blade, Tom Henry)
This July 10, 2014 photo shows a water sample drawn from Lake Erie aboard Ohio State Universities research vessel. Scientists gathered at OSU's Stone Laboratory near Put-In-Bay, Ohio, to discuss the 2014 algae forecast for Western Lake Erie. Ohio Gov. Earlier this month, John Kasich declared a state of emergency in northwest Ohio, where about 400,000 people are being warned not to drink the water. Officials issued the warning Saturday after tests revealed the presence of a toxin possibly from algae on Lake Erie.

University of Toledo forms water task force

– A university in northwestern Ohio says it's forming a group to help government leaders deal with the ongoing algae threat on Lake Erie.

The University of Toledo says the group will act as a resource and provide information about research that's been done on the lake's water quality.

The university already has a research center on Lake Erie that regularly monitors the water.

The move comes some four weeks after Toledo was forced to issue a do-not-drink advisory for 400,000 people after toxins from algae on the lake contaminated the city's water supply.

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