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Associated Press
FILE - In this Dec 22, 2012 file photo, Denton Guyer's Adam Scott (22) is tackled by Georgetown's Blair Murski (44) and Mason Alexander during a UIL Class 4A, Division I high school football championship game in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Matt Strasen)

Poll: Parents uncomfortable with youth football

Associated Press
FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2013 file photo, Richards running back Romeo Johnson (9) is tackled by Batavia center Michael Mofatt, top, and center Forrest Gilbertson, bottom, during the first half of the IHSA Class 6A championship high school football game in DeKalb, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
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FILE - In this Dec. 21, 2013 file photo, Aledo quarterback Luke Bishop (4) is tackled by Brenham's Ryan Nunn (22) in the first half during the UIL Class 4A, Division II high school football championship game in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Matt Strasen)
Associated Press
FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2013 file photo, Eastside Catholic quarterback Harley Kirsch, right, winces moments before being hit by Bellevue's Ryan Bowman, left, in the second half of the Class 3A high school football championship in Tacoma, Wash. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Parents are worried about their children playing football, but most haven’t decided to keep their kids from putting on a helmet and stepping onto the field.

According to an Associated Press-GfK poll, nearly half of parents said they’re not comfortable letting their child play football amid growing uncertainty about the long-term impact of concussions.

In the poll, 44 percent of parents weren’t comfortable with their child playing football. The same percentage was uncomfortable with ice hockey, and 45 percent were uncomfortable with participation in wrestling. Only five percent, though, said they have discouraged their child from playing in the last two years as concern over head injuries has increased at all levels of the game.

The majority of parents said they are comfortable with participation in a host of other sports – including swimming, track and field, basketball, soccer, baseball and softball, among others.

The AP-GfK poll was conducted from July 24-28. It included interviews with 1,044 adults and has a sampling error of plus or minus 3.4 percentage points.

The parents’ concern comes as several high-profile lawsuits have challenged how concussions have been addressed in pro and college sports. Thousands of pro players sued the NFL and a $675 million settlement that would compensate them for concussion-related claims is pending. A tentative settlement with the NCAA, meanwhile, would create a $70 million fund to test thousands of current and former college athletes for brain trauma.

Youth and high school programs have increased training available for coaches, and helmet companies are releasing new designs with the hope that they reduce the force of impact. But research is murky about whether or not they will be effective.

Participation statistics also show only a slight decline in the overall number of high school students playing football.

According to the National Federation of State High School Associations, nearly 1.1 million students played 11-man football during the 2012-13 school year. The number was down approximately 10,000 from the year before and more than 20,000 since 2009-08.

Cathy Curtin, a high school rifle coach in northeast Pennsylvania, is one parent who has discouraged her children from playing football in recent years.

Curtin, 52, has gone through concussion-related training for her job, but one issue that concerns her is how much of identifying a head injury relies on the student’s input following a collision. She said her 21-year-old son “would have said anything” to remain in the game while in high school, including hiding symptoms such as dizziness from a trainer or coach.

“Our training staff is good, but you can’t always know,” Curtin said. “You’re basing whether they can play on their say. And they are 16-year-old kids, 17-year-old kids who want more than anything to get out there and play.”

Curtin said her younger son broke his collarbone and leg while playing football as a freshman.

“Nowhere in that time did they check him for a concussion,” Curtin said. “So, if he got hit hard enough to break his collar bone and his leg, then how hard did he hit the ground, too?”

Football wasn’t the only sport Curtin said she was uncomfortable with. She also worries about hockey, wrestling and other high-impact competitions such as gymnastics and cheerleading. She’s encouraged by new advances – such as chin straps that change color when a player may have suffered a concussion – aimed at reducing and identifying head injuries, but she is also skeptical about school districts’ ability to afford new helmets.

JeMare Williams, 43, is no stranger to the possibility of getting a concussion while playing football. He thinks he “probably” suffered from one while in high school in St. Louis.

“I don’t really know, but I remember being hurt, being dizzy,” Williams said. “But during that time, there wasn’t a specific diagnosis like now.”

Now living in Henderson, Nevada, and with 17- and 11-year-old sons who play the game, Williams – an auto mechanic – has the same injury concerns as many parents. That said, he’s comfortable with his sons playing football – or any other sport they choose.

One of the primary reasons for Williams’ comfort level is because of the increased attention paid to head injuries over the last few years. He said coaches are trained more closely now to teach proper tackling techniques, as well as watch players for signs of concussions.

“There’s a lot of publicity on (concussions) now, and I think that makes it better,” Williams said. “So, I’m not as worried now.”

How the AP-GfK poll was conducted

The Associated Press-GfK poll on children’s sports and injuries was conducted by GfK Public Affairs and Corporate Communications July 24-28. It is based on online interviews of 1,044 adults who are members of GfK’s nationally representative KnowledgePanel.

The original sample was drawn from a panel of respondents recruited via phone or mail survey methods. GfK provides Internet access to panel recruits who don’t already have it. With a probability basis and coverage of people who otherwise couldn’t access the Internet, online surveys using KnowledgePanel are nationally representative.

Interviews were conducted in both English and Spanish.

As is done routinely in surveys, results were weighted, or adjusted, to ensure that responses accurately reflect the population’s makeup by factors such as age, sex, race, education and phone usage.

No more than 1 time in 20 should chance variations in the sample cause the results to vary by more than plus or minus 3.4 percentage points from the answers that would be obtained if all adults in the U.S. were polled. Among the 233 parents of children under age 18, the margin of sampling error is plus or minus 7.2 points.

There are other sources of potential error in polls, including the wording and order of questions.

The poll had a cooperation rate of 47 percent.

The questions and results are available at http://www.ap-gfkpoll.com.

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