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Pentagon may adjust Afghan exit timetable

– The Pentagon has developed plans that would allow U.S. forces to remain in Afghanistan beyond the end of the year if the contested presidential election drags on and a security agreement isn’t signed soon, the top U.S. military officer said Monday.

Shortly before landing in Kabul for a visit, Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chief of Staff, said that under optimal circumstances, the U.S. would need about 120 days to pull all troops and equipment out of the country if there is no agreement allowing them to stay into 2015.

But Dempsey also said the U.S. can act quickly to pull out if needed. And he added, “We’ve got our own planning mechanism in place should this thing extend a little further than we hoped it would.”

Dempsey arrived in Afghanistan to attend the change of U.S. command. Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford will turn over control of the war effort to Army Gen. John Campbell.

The transition comes at a critical time as the election of a new president is stalled while an audit is conducted to determine the outcome. The lack of a president-elect creates a dilemma for the United States, which has said that all troops would leave by the end of the year unless the security agreement is signed.

But officials have suggested there is leeway. If weeks from now there is still no agreement, the military could stay into next year to conduct an orderly departure.

“We’ve said we need a (security agreement), not because necessarily we lack the authority to stay beyond the end of the year, but rather as an expression of good faith and good will” by the Afghan government, Dempsey said.

The April 6 voting to elect a successor to President Hamid Karzai resulted in a runoff between former Foreign Minister Abdullah Abdullah and former Finance Minister Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai.

Abdullah received the most votes in the first round but failed to get the 50 percent needed to win. Preliminary results indicated that Ahmadzai was ahead in the runoff.

Both men have said they will sign the security agreement that gives U.S. forces the necessary legal protections to stay in the country. Karzai refused to sign the agreement.

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