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As bombs fall over Iraq, old emotions rise in US

Old emotions about Iraq are resurfacing across America. People are conflicted about President Barack Obama’s decision to bomb Islamic militants there.

Many support the airstrikes, but do so for contrasting reasons. People who oppose the bombing say the U.S. never should have invaded in the first place. But they struggle with defining America’s responsibility to a nation it upended in a long and costly war.

In interviews, no one sees a concrete solution to Iraq’s problems.

Neil McCanon, who supports the decision to bomb the militants, says he’s torn about how much force should be used. As a U.S. Army veteran who fought there, he doesn’t want Iraq to fall into chaos.

Almost 4,500 American troops were killed in Iraq from the 2003 invasion to Obama’s withdrawal in 2011.

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