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Associated Press
Fruitland Park, Fla., Police Chief Terry Isaacs talks about two officers no longer in the department after an investigation tied them to the Ku Klux Klan.

Fla. officers found connected to Klan

– Ann Hunnewell and her central Florida police officer husband knelt in the living room of a fellow officer’s home, with pillow cases as makeshift hoods. A few words were spoken and they, along with a half-dozen others, were initiated into the local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan, she says.

Last week, that five-year-old initiation ceremony stunned residents of the small town of Fruitland Park, who found out that an investigative report linked two city officers with the secret hate society that once was violently active in the area.

Ann Hunnewell’s ex-husband, George Hunnewell, was fired, and deputy chief David Borst resigned from the 13-member Fruitland Park Police Department. Borst has denied being a member.

James Elkins, a third officer who Ann Hunnewell says recruited her and her husband, resigned in 2010 after his Klan ties became public.

The violence against blacks that permeated the area was more than 60 years ago, when the place was more rural and the main industry was citrus. These days, the community of less than 5,000 residents about 50 miles northwest of Orlando has been infused by the thousands of wealthier, more cosmopolitan retirees in the area.

As recently as the 1960s, many in law enforcement in the South were members, but “it’s exceedingly unusual these days to find a police officer who is secretly a Klansman,” said Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center, which monitors hate groups.

While the Klan was politically powerful in the 1920s, when governors and U.S. senators were among its 4 million members, now it is much less active than other sectors of the radical right and has fewer than 5,000 members nationwide, Potok said.

“The radical right is quite large and vigorous. The Klan is very small,” he said. “The radical right looks down on the Klan.”

Fruitland Park, though, has been dealing with alleged KKK ties and other problems in the police ranks since 2010, when Elkins resigned after his estranged wife made his membership public.

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