You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Indiana

  • Notre Dame to hold ‘Gay in Christ’ conference
    SOUTH BEND – The University of Notre Dame is holding a two-day conference to explore appropriate pastoral strategies for parishioners who regard themselves as non-heterosexual but accept Catholic Church teaching on marriage and
  • BMV branches extend hours for November election
     INDIANAPOLIS – Time is running out for Indiana residents who want to vote in next month’s midterm elections to obtain the proper identification they’ll need to cast ballots at polling places.
  • Man was violent long before 7 killings
       GARY – With hindsight, there were signs years ago of increasing violence against women by Darren Vann, who police say has confessed to killing seven women in northwestern Indiana
Advertisement

Game to help teach teens about laws

– Indianapolis police are trying out an interactive computer game based on television’s “Jeopardy!” to prevent teenagers from falling into lives of crime by teaching them about the consequences of breaking Indiana’s laws.

Police spokesman Lt. Chris Bailey said the teens who will attend today’s inaugural local presentation of the “Juvenile Justice Jeopardy” computer game will be treated to free pizza at a YMCA branch in a crime-troubled east-side district.

But he said the game is serious and full of sobering facts to help teens understand the state’s laws, the penalties for breaking them and how they should interact with police to avoid arrest.

Many teens don’t understand, for example, that they can face arrest for actions such as accepting a ride in a stolen car, whether or not they know that vehicle is stolen, Bailey said.

“The adult mind typically doesn’t fully develop comprehensive thoughts until the 20s. We want to show these kids what the consequences are for doing certain things, and try to prevent them from ever entering the juvenile justice system,” he said Monday.

Two local businessmen paid the $15,000 cost of the game and its licenses so that it can be used by the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department and the Indy Public Safety Foundation for years to come. Strategies for Youth developed the game.

It’s tailored to Indiana’s criminal code and includes facts such as that the cost of going through the state’s juvenile justice system for a crime is typically between $300 and $400, said Lisa Thurau, executive director of the nonprofit Strategies for Youth.

The interactive, scenario-based game takes 90 minutes to play and youngsters are asked 26 questions, she said.

Like “Jeopardy!” the game has five categories from which players can choose, including “Juvenile Justice,” “Police/Youth Interaction” and “Juvenile Records.”

Thurau said that when teens get the right answers they score points and the program responds with loud applause. If they get it wrong, the computer produces a disappointed “aww.”

The computer game was created in 2011 and has been used in many after-school programs in the U.S.

Advertisement