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Golf

  • Till stays calm, takes title
      After squandering a couple opportunities to win big tournaments this summer, Sam Till Jr. found himself fighting nervousness Tuesday.He was afraid the same thing would happen again, but it didn’t.
  • Till Jr. wins Senior City golf title
    After squandering a couple opportunities to win big tournaments this summer, Sam Till Jr. found himself fighting nervousness today that the same thing would happen.It did not.Till shot his second even-par 71 at Orchard Ridge Country
  • Till in lead after soggy 1st round of city seniors
      The players in the Senior City Golf Championship on Monday couldn’t help but chuckle, as they endured a day’s worth of rain and mosquito bites, plus the usual frustration that comes with playing golf.
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Associated Press
Lydia Ko won her second tournament as a pro Sunday, the Marathon Classic in Sylvania, Ohio.

Ko, 17, earns first $1 million with win

– Now that she’s officially a millionaire, Lydia Ko joked she’ll have to keep a closer watch on where her paychecks go.

“I’ll probably see that going into my mom’s account,” she said with a laugh, referring to the $210,000 she got for winning Sunday’s Marathon Classic.

The 17-year-old broke free from a late tie with So Yeon Ryu, hitting a wedge to 4 feet for birdie on the 72nd hole to take the lead. Then she tried in vain – she’s just 5-foot-5 – to see past the large gallery at 18 as Ryu missed a 6-foot birdie putt on the final hole that would have forced a playoff.

“I couldn’t see it properly. I was behind some people,” she said after her second LPGA Tour victory that matched the two Canadian Open titles she won as an amateur. “But I kind of could tell what happened by the crowd’s reaction.”

She became the youngest player to top $1 million in earnings on the LPGA Tour. Ko is roughly 17 months younger than Lexi Thompson, previously the youngest. Ko, a tour rookie, has six top-10 finishes in addition to her wins, with five of those being top-fives.

Ryu had poured in a big-breaking, 25-foot birdie putt on the 17th to pull even.

But then Ko stuck her approach at the par-5 closing hole and calmly rolled in the birdie putt for a 6-under 65 that left her at 15-under 269.

Ryu hit a brilliant third shot to the green but pushed her 6-footer at the 18th.

“Absolutely I’m disappointed I missed (that) birdie putt,” she said. “Sometimes if I get something lucky, then I get something that is unlucky. I just accept it and let it go.”

Ko also shrugged aside a challenge from veteran Cristie Kerr, who pulled into a tie with her on the homeward nine.

Ko started the final round in fifth place, three shots behind co-leaders Laura Diaz and Lee-Anne Pace.

While they foundered, she crept up the leader board with birdies at holes 3 and 4. She tied for the top spot with a 12-foot birdie putt at the par-3 eighth, then took a solo lead for the first time after hitting her approach to 10 feet at the 10th.

Kerr, seeking her 17th career victory, rolled in a left-to-right breaker from 15 feet at the 13th to pull even. But her approach on the 399-yard, par-4 15th missed left and settled into heavy rough. She muscled the pitch shot onto the green but it rolled 6 feet past and she lipped out the par putt.

Kerr, who shot a 67 to finish three shots back in third, failed to apply pressure when she could not birdie the closing two par-5s.

“I had a good/bad week,” she said. “I didn’t play 17 and 18 well all week. If you’re going to win here you have to take advantage of those holes.”

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