You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Worth a click

  • Letter that inspired Kerouac found
    It's been called the letter that launched a literary genre — 16,000 amphetamine-fueled, stream-of-consciousness words written by Neal Cassady to his friend Jack Kerouac in 1950.
  • Christmas tree ignites outcry for being ugly
    A Christmas tree that might make Charlie Brown think twice is getting kicked to the curb a little early after residents of a Pennsylvania town complained it was too ugly.
  • Roundup for rhino safety
    The rhino crashes forward, pounding the earth with its broad feet.
Advertisement
Associated Press
Palestinians inspect the damage to the house of Hamas leader, Mahmoud Zahar, following an early morning Israeli missile strike in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 16, 2014. Israel on Wednesday intensified air attacks on Hamas targets in the Gaza Strip following a failed Egyptian cease-fire effort, targeting the homes of four senior leaders of the Islamic militant movement and ordering tens of thousands of residents to evacuate border areas. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

10 Things to Know for Wednesday, July 16

Associated Press
FILE - Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Jacqueline Berrien speaks at a Middle Class Task Force event in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building across from the White House in Washington, in this Tuesday, July 20, 2010 file photo. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has updated 30-year-old guidelines to make clear that any form of workplace discrimination or harassment against pregnant workers by employers is a form of sex discrimination and illegal. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
Associated Press
This photo taken in January, 2014 shows Sendai Nuclear Power Station in Sendai, Kagoshima prefecture, southern Japan. The nuclear power plant in southern Japan has received a passing grade for safety requirements raised after the Fukushima disaster, clearing a major hurdle toward becoming the first to restart under the tighter rules. The Nuclear Regulation Authority gave preliminary approval Wednesday, July 16, 2014 to a report that concludes that two reactors at Sendai Nuclear Power Station have complied with the new regulations and are capable of avoiding disasters such as the Fukushima Dai-ichi meltdowns, even if the plant faces equally harsh conditions. (AP Photo/Kyodo News)
Associated Press
Eggs are stacked next to the grill Tuesday, June 24, 2014, at Jefferson University Hospital's cafeteria in Philadelphia. Locally grown foods aren’t just for farmers markets anymore. A growing network of companies and organizations is delivering food directly from local farms to institutions like hospitals and schools, eliminating middlemen from farm to fork. They’re increasing profits for smaller farms and bringing consumers healthier foods.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Associated Press
In this Friday, July 11, 2014 photo, people are rafted to the Mexican shore, across the Suchiate river that separates Tecun Uman, Guatemala and Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, on a makeshift raft made from inner tubes of trucks attached to wooden boards. Scores of Central Americans pay a modest fee crossing the river on these improvised rafts. Mexican politicians generally see little upside in cracking down on migrants who simply want to pass through on the way to the U.S., just like so many Mexicans have done. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Associated Press
Pedestrians wait to ride a train at Jamaica station on the Long Island Rail Road Tuesday, July 15, 2014, in New York. Prospects of a strike which the unions said they were planning at 12:01 a.m. next Sunday, would affect 300,000 daily riders who travel in and out of New York City from Long Island. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Associated Press
In this Wednesday, May 21, 2014 photo, Emirati and other customers enjoy their free time at the Bateel Cafe in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Mideast entrepreneurs who have taken on international competition are now turning the tables, exporting local foods including falafel and premium dates overseas and proving that the globalization of food is not one-way. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)
Associated Press
Sprinklers water a lawn Tuesday morning, July 15, 2014, in Sacramento, Calif. In an effort to force the public to conserve water, the State Water Resources Control Board voted 4-0 to approve a proposal that includes fines up to $500 a day for people who waste water on landscaping, fountains, washing vehicles and other outdoor uses. The new regulations would prohibit the watering of landscaping to the point that runoff spills onto sidewalks or streets, hosing down sidewalks, driveways and other hard surfaces. Also banned would be washing of vehicles without a shut-off nozzle. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
Associated Press
In this July 10, 2014 photo, Tyler Long, of Mechanicsburg, Penn., is timed during a speed climbing drill at the Adirondack Woodsmen's School at Paul Smith's College in Paul Smiths, N.Y. Eighteen young students in matching gray sports shirts took part recently in a weeklong crash course on old-school lumberjack skills such as sawing, chopping, ax throwing, log boom running and pole climbing. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
Associated Press
American League shortstop Derek Jeter, of the New York Yankees, waves as he is taken out of the game in the top of the fourth inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 15, 2014, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. ISRAELI RAIDS ON GAZA INTENSIFY

Hundreds of Palestinians flee Gaza border areas after Israel tells them to leave ahead of further strikes.

2. AGENCY TOUGHENS PROTECTIONS FOR PREGNANT WORKERS

New U.S. government guidelines prohibit employers from forcing pregnant workers to take leave and acknowledge that bosses may have to decrease workloads.

3. JAPAN SET TO REOPEN FIRST NUCLEAR PLANT SINCE FUKUSHIMA

The only facility to win approval to operate after the fatal disaster three years ago had to comply with stringent safety requirements.

4. HOW LOCAL FOODS ARE BECOMING BIG BUSINESS

Organizations delivering directly from local farms to major institutions are growing, eliminating scores of middlemen from farm to fork.

5. WHO IS PROMISING TO HELP WASHINGTON ON IMMIGRATION

Mexico says it will tighten its porous border with Guatemala where thousands of migrants cross, hoping to continue north to the U.S.

6. NYC MAYOR ON LIRR: WHAT, ME WORRY?

Bill de Blasio has a vacation in Italy planned–funded in part by taxpayers–and seemingly no intention of letting a looming strike at the nation’s largest commuter railroad hold him back. Besides, he says, people “now, because of technology, can work from home.”

7. WHERE MIDDLE EASTERN FOOD IS HEADED

Entrepreneurs from the region’s buzzing restaurant scene are eyeing franchise opportunities in the U.S. and Europe.

8. 'COMMUNITIES IN DANGER OF RUNNING OUT'

That’s what a state regulator says as water use by Californians rises despite the governor’s pleas to cut back during the severe drought.

9. BARKING UP THE WRONG CAREER TREE? TRY LUMBERJACK SCHOOL

Don’t let the absence of bushy beards, plaid shirts and even suspenders fool you. Paul Smith’s College teaches aspiring woodsmen to do things like throw an ax and climb a 45-foot pole.

10. 'THIS IS ABOUT DEREK JETER'

That’s what Tampa Bay pitcher David Price says about the 14th and final All-Star Game for the retiring New York Yankees shortstop.

Advertisement