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Semifinals
Today
At Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Brazil vs. Germany, 4 p.m.
Wednesday
At Sao Paulo
Netherlands vs. Argentina, 4 p.m.
TV: ESPN
Associated Press
Brazil’s coach Luiz Felipe Scolari gives instructions to his players during a practice session in Teresopolis, Brazil, on Monday. Brazil will face Germany today in a World Cup semifinal match without Neymar.
World Cup

Brazil suddenly underdog

Minus Neymar, captain, hosts at disadvantage to Germany

BELO HORIZONTE, Brazil - Since October 2007, when FIFA awarded the 2014 World Cup to this soccer-insane land, the Brazilian national team has been tagged the favorite. Never mind that the Selecao fell well short of winning the 2010 tournament in South Africa or endured rough patches in the long build-up to this year's soccer samba.

Brazil has hoisted more World Cup trophies than anyone, and with the sport's ultimate competition on home grass for the first time in more than two generations, the story line has been unwavering: On July 13, Luiz Felipe Scolari and his band of one-name wonders would dance into the Rio night.

Even when they sputtered through the group stage and narrowly escaped knockout challenges, the Brazilians clung to favored status.

That is, until Colombia's Juan Zuniga drove his right knee into Neymar's lower back, cracking a vertebra and knocking the superstar out of the tournament. Until captain Thiago Silva was ruled out of the semifinal on a yellow card suspension. And until they realized their next opponent would be the systematic Germans, three-time champions who could not care less who or where they are playing.

So when the Brazilians enter Estadio Mineirao today with a trip to Maracana at stake, they will do so as challengers.

Along those lines, Scolari said: “We respect (the Germans), but we are going to try to make them respect us.”

Brazil was a team on edge even before the personnel losses, bending under the seismic pressure of hosting the World Cup in a country where soccer is part of the national identity.

“I will have my heart on the field with the players, just as Neymar will have his heart on the field,” Thiago Silva said. “Things are happening to make the group more united. I won't be there, Neymar won't be there, so it will be different, but I believe in the strength of the group.”

German Coach Joachim Loew is not buying the narrative of a Brazilian underdog at home.

“You shouldn't believe the absence of Neymar and Thiago Silva would be a disadvantage for Brazil,” he said. “Other players will feel liberated. You see when a very strong player is missing and the other players will have to accept more responsibility. I am certain all of the others will be fighting for Neymar, fighting for the nation.

“Brazil will unleash all of its passion, all of its strong emotions and put them into the match. Any attack that will come close to our goal will be accompanied by the enormous potential of the Brazilian fans.”

While Brazil will attempt to harness the crowd's sway, Germany will aim to remove the emotional influence and continue performing at its efficient and tactical best. The Germans, too, have sputtered at times, but in tense situations in big tournaments, no one is better.

With Brazil's issues, Germany has surfaced as both the favorite in this semifinal and to win the championship, regardless of whether the Netherlands or Argentina survives Wednesday's semifinal in Sao Paulo.

“It is motivation for us,” defender Jerome Boateng said of the feverish atmosphere in Belo Horizonte. “The whole stadium will be against us.”

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