You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

U.S.

  • White House intruder identified as Army veteran
    The man accused of getting inside the White House after scaling a fence is a veteran who was awarded a medal for his service in Iraq and retired due to disability, the Army said Sunday.
  • Large freighter runs aground, gets stuck in Duluth
    The largest freighter on the Great Lakes was stuck for about three hours after it ran aground near Bayfront Park in Duluth.  WDIO-TV reports the 1,000-foot Paul R.
  • Security breach prompts more White House security
    The Secret Service tightened security outside the White House after an embarrassing breach in which a man with a knife scaled a fence, ran across the lawn and made it all the way inside before agents stopped him.
Advertisement
Associated Press
A lone sentry watches from the pier as waves batter the shore Thursday in Cherry Grove Beach, S.C. As Hurricane Arthur gained strength, thousands of vacationers fled the Carolina coast.

Stronger Arthur disrupts holiday

– A strengthening Hurricane Arthur forced thousands of vacationers on the North Carolina coast to abandon their Independence Day plans while cities farther up the East Coast rescheduled fireworks displays threatened by rain from the storm.

Arthur strengthened to a Category 2 hurricane Thursday night, with winds of 100 mph as the storm neared North Carolina. Little change was expected in the storm's strength Thursday night and today, and Arthur was expected to weaken as it travels northward and slings rain along the East Coast.

The annual Boston Pops Fourth of July concert and fireworks show was rescheduled for Thursday because of Arthur, while fireworks displays in New Jersey, Maine and New Hampshire were postponed until later in the weekend.

Either late Thursday or early today, Arthur was expected to pass over or near North Carolina and its Outer Banks – a 200-mile string of narrow barrier islands with about 57,000 permanent residents.

“We don't know for sure if the exact center of Arthur is going to pass over land or not,” said Rick Knabb, director of the U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami. “The chances have been increasing for that to occur with the last couple of forecasts.

“But even if the exact center doesn't go over you, you will experience impacts tonight,” he said. “The weather is going downhill in North Carolina, even as we speak.”

The islands are susceptible to high winds, rough seas and road-clogging sands, prompting an exodus that began Wednesday night.

Among the tourists leaving Hatteras Island were 27-year-old Nichole Specht and 28-year-old Ryan Witman of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The couple started driving at 3:30 a.m. Thursday on North Carolina Highway 12, the only road on and off Hatteras.

Many island residents, meanwhile, decided to ride out the powerful storm rather than risk losing access to homes connected to the mainland by a highway prone to washouts.

“All the people that I know who live here are staying put,” said Mike Rabe, who planned to stay in his Rodanthe home despite an evacuation order for surrounding Hatteras Island.

Before the storm hit, tourism officials had expected 250,000 people to travel to the Outer Banks for the holiday weekend.

Advertisement