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Antennas in area compete for space

There are no peek-a-boo cellular antennas in Fort Wayne.

Allen County has more than 100 wireless phone towers, but most of them are in wooded areas where they are already camouflaged.

Paul Blisk, deputy director for land use with Allen County, said towers should be out of the “line of sight of vehicles and residences.” Most of the wireless antennas were erected in the mid- to late 1990s, he said.

“The digital towers are 200 feet or less,” Blisk said. “When it was all analog, they had to build them taller.”

Public complaints about the towers have been minimal, but Blisk said as developers branch out into untapped wooded areas to build subdivisions and other projects, it makes finding open spaces for antennas more of a challenge.

“There’s only so much room out there,” he said.

Verizon Wireless spokesman Trevor Thomas said the company has spent $1.5 billion on network enhancements since 2000 in Indiana.

“People are using more wireless devices and we want to make sure they have a (good) experience,” he said.

As far as masking wireless towers, Thomas couldn’t say if there is any hiding in Allen County.

“It’s on a case-by-case basis,” he said, “and will depend on the neighborhood.”

pwyche@jg.net

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