You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Editorials

  • Collateral damage
    Some day, it will all be over. That's the only nugget of hope extractable from Huntertown's many-fronted battle to develop its own sewage-treatment system.
  • Honoring the gift given by generations past
    Fort Wayne's Legacy Fund should be treated the same as the assets of a private foundation.
  • Collateral damage
    Some day, it will all be over. That’s the only nugget of hope extractable from Huntertown’s many-fronted battle to develop its own sewage-treatment system.
Advertisement

Furthermore …

Gun lust costing us freedom

The other day, it almost seemed plausible that the National Rifle Association had come to its senses.

The association issued a news release denouncing the Open Carry folks in Texas, saying their insistence on displaying semi-automatic weapons in a restaurant was not only unwise but “weird.”

Of course, after the Open Carry people protested, an NRA official hastily announced that the posting had been a mistake.

There have been times and places when people had to be conspicuously armed when they went about their day-to-day activities: areas of Asia and Africa torn by civil or tribal warfare; parts of the American frontier in the 18th and 19th centuries; and jungle settlements when rogue animals with a taste for human flesh are on the prowl nearby.

Future historians will be puzzled why what was once one of the most technologically advanced, enlightened societies in history aspired to ascend to such a high level of everyday wariness.

They will marvel at how virtually unlimited access to and display of firearms was pushed upon a reluctant majority by a relatively tiny group of particularly vocal and politically organized zealots.

They will find it particularly ironic that the unlimited-guns advocates so effectively used the concept of “freedom” to justify their cause.

As the future historians will see – as anyone who lived in one of those other places or times when guns were truly an essential part of daily life could have told us – no one is less free than a man, woman or child who must live in constant fear of death.

Advertisement