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Associated Press
Rafael Nadal drops to his knees after defeating Novak Djokovic 3-6, 7-5, 6-2, 6-4 to win his ninth French Open on Sunday in Paris.

Nadal continues air-tight lock on French Open

Beats Djokovic for 9th title on clay of Paris, 14th major victory

– Trying to beat Rafael Nadal at the French Open is, without a doubt, the toughest task in tennis. Indeed, must be among the greatest challenges in all of sports.

The pressure he applies, from set to set, game to game, point to point, shot to shot. That bullwhip of a high-bouncing, topspin lefty forehand. Those quick-reflex returns that help him break an opponent’s serve – and his will.

Doing what he does so well on the red clay of Roland Garros, a surface and site he dominates so completely, the No. 1-seeded Nadal wore down No. 2 Novak Djokovic 3-6, 7-5, 6-2, 6-4 in a muggy final Sunday to win his ninth French Open championship and fifth in a row, both records.

“For me,” Nadal said, “playing here in Roland Garros is just unforgettable, forever.”

It is also his 14th Grand Slam title overall, tying the 28-year-old Spaniard with Pete Sampras for the second most by a man, behind only Roger Federer’s 17.

That includes Nadal’s two trophies apiece at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open, along with one from the Australian Open, proving he can beat the best on grass and hard courts, too. But it’s on the clay of Paris where Nadal reigns supreme: He has won 66 of 67 career French Open matches.

Since the only loss, against Robin Soderling in the fourth round in 2009, Nadal has won 35 consecutive matches at Roland Garros.

No other man has won more than seven titles at any of tennis’ four majors.

“It’s not impossible, but it’s very, very difficult to stay with Rafa in this court, throughout the whole match, on the highest level of performance,” said Djokovic, who was broken in the final game of each set, including with an anticlimactic double-fault on match point.

Nadal ensured that he, not Djokovic, will be ranked No. 1 today. In the process, Nadal once again prevented six-time major champion Djokovic from completing a career Grand Slam.

“He deserves to win this tournament,” Nadal said. “I am sure he will do it in the future.”

Using his backhand to great effect against Nadal’s forehand early, Djokovic grabbed the first set, and got to 5-all in the second.

“I felt,” Nadal said, “the match was more in his hands at the beginning.”

Knowing that overcoming a two-set hole might be too much even for him, Nadal raised his level, taking 20 of 26 points to claim that set and a 3-0 lead in the third.

“Without that second set, I don’t know if I have this trophy with me now,” Nadal said.

When a down-the-line forehand winner ended the second set, Nadal leapt and shook both fists, his first sign of real emotion.

“The momentum went (to) his side,” Djokovic said. “I started playing quite bad and didn’t move as well. Struggled a little bit physically throughout that third set.”

Still, after trailing 4-2 in the fourth, Djokovic made one last stand. As skilled a retriever as his formidable foe – Djokovic won 10 of the first 15 points that lasted at least 10 strokes – he came up with a desperation defensive lob that landed right near the baseline, drawing a netted overhead from Nadal to earn a break point. Soon, it was 4-all.

But Nadal steadied himself to hold to 5-4, then broke one last time. Soon enough, he was clutching the trophy.

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