You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

World

  • Investigators reach Ukraine jet-crash site
    ROZSYPNE, Ukraine – As fighting raged in eastern Ukraine, an international team of investigators on Thursday reached the crash site of Malaysian Airline Flight 17 and got a first look at where it was brought down by a missile two weeks ago.
  • Israeli shells hit school, market
    Israeli artillery shells tore through the walls of a U.N.
  • Israel calls up another 16,000 reserves
    Israel’s military said Thursday it was calling up another 16,000 reserves, a move that allows it to substantially widen its 23-day campaign against Islamic militants in the Gaza Strip.
Advertisement
Associated Press
Pope Francis looks on as Israel’s President Shimon Peres, left, and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas greet each other at peace prayer event Sunday.

Pope aims for peace at prayer summit

Israel, Palestinian presidents meet after failed talks

– Pope Francis plunged head-first into Mideast peacemaking Sunday, welcoming the Israeli and Palestinian presidents to the Vatican for a remarkable evening of peace prayers just weeks after the last round of U.S.-sponsored negotiations collapsed.

Israeli President Shimon Peres and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas joked and embraced in the foyer of the Vatican hotel where Francis lives and later in the Vatican gardens, where they joined Francis in presiding over a sunset invocation of Jewish, Christian and Muslim prayers.

Francis told the two men, who signed the Oslo peace accords in 1993, that he hoped the summit would mark “a new journey” toward peace. He said too many children had been killed by war and violence, and that their memory should instill the strength and patience to work for dialogue and coexistence.

“Peacemaking calls for courage, much more so than warfare,” he said. “It calls for the courage to say yes to encounter and no to conflict.”

The event had the air of an outdoor summer wedding, complete with receiving line and guests mingling on the lawn as a string ensemble played. Only the two key protagonists are technically on opposite sides of the intractable Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Vatican officials have insisted that Francis had no political agenda in inviting the two leaders to pray at his home other than to rekindle a desire for peace.

But the meeting could have greater symbolic significance, given that Francis was able to bring them together at all so soon after peace talks failed and at a time that the Israeli government is trying to isolate Abbas.

“In the Middle East, symbolic gestures and incremental steps are important,” noted the Rev. Thomas Reese, a veteran Vatican analyst for the National Catholic Reporter. “And who knows what conversations can occur behind closed doors in the Vatican.”

The meeting has also cemented Francis’ reputation as a leader who is willing to go out on a limb for the sake of peace.

Francis capitalized on both his own enormous popularity and the peace-loving heritage of his namesake, St. Francis of Assisi, to bring the two sides together.

The unusual prayer summit was a feat of diplomatic and religious protocol, organized in the two weeks since Francis issued the surprise invitation to Peres and Abbas from Manger Square in Bethlehem.

It took place in the lush Vatican gardens in the shadow of St. Peter’s Basilica, the most religiously neutral place in the tiny city-state.

It incorporated Jewish, Christian and Muslim prayers, delivered in Hebrew, English, Arabic and Italian and with musical interludes from the three faith traditions.

The prayers focused on three themes common to each of the religions: thanking God for creation, seeking forgiveness for past wrongdoing and praying to God to bring peace to the region.

Advertisement