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Associated Press
Burt Shavitz, a former beekeeper, is the Burt behind Burt’s Bees. The now-ousted Shavitz is the subject of a new documentary, “Burt’s Buzz,” which opens Friday in limited release.

Burt’s Bees film reveals co-founder forced out

– Conventional wisdom suggests that the Burt behind Burt’s Bees left the company after he became disillusioned with the corporate world in North Carolina and wanted to return to his solitary life in Maine.

The reality, Burt Shavitz says, is that he was forced out by co-founder Roxanne Quimby after he had an affair with an employee.

So the man on the Burt’s Bees logo ended up with 37 acres in Maine and an undisclosed sum of money.

And he’s not complaining.

“In the long run, I got the land, and land is everything. Land is positively everything. And money is nothing really worth squabbling about. This is what puts people 6 feet under. You know, I don’t need it,” he told a filmmaker on property where the company was launched in the 1980s.

The reclusive beekeeper whose simple life became complicated by his status as a corporate icon is the subject of a documentary, “Burt’s Buzz,” which opens Friday in cities including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Cleveland.

Shavitz declined to discuss his relationship with Quimby.

“The bottom line is she’s got her world and I’ve got mine, and we let it go at that.”

Shavitz, 79, grew up around New York, served in the Army in Germany and shot photos for Time-Life before leaving New York for the backwoods of Maine.

He was a hippie making a living by selling honey when his life was altered by a chance encounter with a hitchhiking Quimby. She was a single mother who impressed Shavitz with her ingenuity and self-sufficiency.

She began making products from his beeswax, and they became partners. The partnership ended on a sour note after the business moved in 1994 to North Carolina, where it continued to expand before Shavitz was given the boot. These days, he makes occasional promotional appearances on the company’s behalf.

Quimby, who made more than $300 million when she sold the company, disagrees with any suggestion that Shavitz was treated improperly.

“Everyone associated with the company was treated fairly, and in some cases very generously, upon the sale of the company and my departure as CEO. And that, of course, includes Burt,” she said in an email to the AP.

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