You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

U.S.

  • Pilot's fate unknown in fighter-jet crash
    DEERFIELD, Va. – An experienced pilot was missing Wednesday after the flier’s F-15 fighter jet crashed in the mountains of western Virginia, shaking residents but causing no injuries on the ground, military and law enforcement officials
  • US sanctions leadership of terrorist group
    WASHINGTON – The Treasury Department on Wednesday sanctioned a leader and a financial network used by a Pakistan-based terrorist group blamed for the 2008 attack in Mumbai, India that killed 166 people.
  • Legroom statistics touch a nerve with cramped airline passengers
    WASHINGTON - When two United Airlines passengers did battle this week over legroom, they touched a nerve among cramped passengers everywhere. Fliers aren’t imagining it:
Advertisement

Freed GI’s peers vent mixed views

Bergdahl

– Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl’s recovery after five years in captivity has rekindled anger among some of his military peers over how he came to fall into enemy hands and the price the United States has paid to get him back.

Bergdahl, 28, is believed to have slipped away from his platoon’s small outpost in Afghanistan’s Paktika province on June 30, 2009, after growing disillusioned with the U.S. military’s war effort.

He was captured shortly afterward by enemy forces and held captive in Pakistan by insurgents affiliated with the Taliban.

At the time, an entire U.S. military division and thousands of Afghan soldiers and police devoted weeks to searching for him, and some soldiers resented risking their lives for someone they considered a deserter.

Bergdahl was recovered Saturday by a U.S. Special Operations team in Afghanistan after weeks of intense negotiations in which U.S. officials, working through the government of Qatar, negotiated a prisoner swap with the Taliban. In exchange for his release, the United States agreed to free five Taliban commanders from captivity at the military detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

The news was hailed by President Barack Obama on Saturday as a sign of Washington’s “ironclad commitment to bring our prisoners of war home.” But the reaction from current and former U.S. service members was decidedly more mixed. Some said that although they were glad to see Bergdahl freed, he must be held accountable for his choices.

Disappearing from a military post in a war zone without authorization commonly results in one of two criminal charges in the Army: desertion or going absent without leave, or AWOL. Desertion is the more serious one, and usually arises in cases where an individual intends to remain away from the military or to “shirk important duty,” including a combat deployment such as Bergdahl’s.

Javier Ortiz, a former combat medic in the Army, said he is frustrated with Bergdahl’s actions and thinks he should be tried for desertion, even after five years in captivity in Pakistan. Many U.S. troops had misgivings about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan while they were deployed but did not act on it as Bergdahl did, said Ortiz, of Lawton, Oklahoma.

“I had a responsibility while I was there to the guys I was with, and that’s why this hits the hardest,” said Ortiz, who was in Iraq from March 2003 to March 2004 with the 101st Airborne Division. “Regardless of what you learned while being there, we still have a responsibility to the men to our left and right. It’s terrible, what he did.”

But U.S. troops said they were aware of the circumstances of Bergdahl’s disappearance – that he left the base of his own volition – and with that awareness, many grew angry.

“The unit completely changed its operational posture because of something that was selfish, not because a solider was captured in combat,” said one U.S. soldier formerly based in Afghanistan who spoke on the condition of anonymity. “There were military assets required … but the problem came of his own accord.”

The search in Paktika was eventually called off, after U.S. officials acknowledged that Bergdahl had been taken to Pakistan.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, speaking Sunday in Bagram, Afghanistan, declined to talk about any possible action by the military against Bergdahl. A senior defense official indicated that punitive action was unlikely.

“Five years is enough,” he said.

Advertisement