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Associated Press
People walk near a McDonald's restaurants in Bangkok, Thailand

McDonald's to Thais: No arches in protest signs

BANGKOK — McDonald's is not loving it in Thailand.

The burger chain's famous golden arches have become part of the iconography of anti-coup protests and it is warning activists to "cease and refrain" from using its trademark.

One of the McDonald's stores in Bangkok has become a gathering place for protests following the May 22 military takeover because of its central location. Some protesters have used the McDonald's logo in their anti-coup signs, replacing the "m'' in democracy with the yellow arches.

McThai, which operates McDonald's restaurants in Thailand, said it is maintaining a "neutral stance" amid political turbulence in the Southeast Asian kingdom famous for its ornate temples, vibrant nightlife and white sand beaches.

The company said it could take "appropriate measures" if protesters continue to appropriate its logo.

Thailand's army seized power after six months of protests in Bangkok aimed at ousting the elected government.

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