You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Business

Advertisement
Other reports
Durable goods: Orders for durable manufactured goods rose 0.8 percent from the previous month after a 3.6 percent gain in March, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. The April strength stemmed from a big jump in demand for defense goods including airplanes.
Home prices: U.S. home prices rose in March, but the gains are decelerating as fewer Americans can afford to buy. The Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index rose 12.4 percent in March, compared with 12 months earlier. While healthy, that rate of growth has slowed from both February and January.
Associated Press
The Conference Board reported Tuesday that its confidence index rose to 83 from a revised 81.7 in April. That’s the second-highest reading since January 2008. A recent burst of hiring likely has boosted confidence.

Job gains boost consumer confidence

– U.S. consumers were slightly more confident in the economy in May than in April, partly because of strengthening optimism about future hiring and income gains.

The Conference Board said Tuesday that its confidence index rose to 83 from a revised 81.7 in April. That’s the second-highest reading since January 2008, just after the recession began. Only March was higher at 83.9.

The increase is “enough to suggest decent, but not spectacular, gains in consumers’ spending,” said Ian Shepherdson, chief economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics, in a note to clients.

Confidence has climbed steadily since it bottomed out at 25.3 in February 2009. It sits significantly above last year’s average of 72.3. But it still isn’t back to healthy levels. The figure regularly topped 90 before the recession.

A rising stock market helped boost confidence in May, economists said. Gains, however, were likely limited by higher gas prices pushing in the opposite direction.

Overall, Americans are much more bullish about the job market, the Conference Board’s survey showed. That’s a good sign that hiring may have been healthy this month. The government will report May’s jobs figures on June 6.

The number of Americans who consider jobs easier to find rose to a six-year high. And 15.4 percent of consumers expect hiring to pick up in the next six months, up from 14.7 percent in April.

The survey also showed that nearly one-fifth of Americans expect their incomes to grow over the next six months, the highest level since December 2007. More Americans said they planned to buy a car in the next six months, though the percentage saying they planned to buy a house fell to the lowest level in 15 months.

A recent burst of hiring likely has boosted confidence.

Employers added 288,000 jobs in April, the most in 2 1/2 years. The national unemployment rate fell to 6.3 percent in April from 6.7 percent.

Economic growth is expected to bounce back in the current April-June quarter, perhaps to an annual pace as high as 3.5 percent. Home construction, car sales and retail sales have all recovered as the weather has improved.

Advertisement