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In the News: Field named after former Notre Dame coach needs help

Field named after ND coach needs help

WINNER, S.D. – Baseball supporters in Winner are trying to save night games at a field named for legendary Notre Dame football coach Frank Leahy, who grew up in the South Dakota town.

The Leahy Bowl sits at the bottom of a hill, with bleachers built into the hillsides. Spectators also can watch games from vehicles atop the hill. One of the field’s eight 80-foot light towers blew down during a recent storm. The town doesn’t have the money to fix the problem and has suspended all games, the Daily Republic reported.

It will cost at least $140,000 to replace the blown-down tower and strengthen the others. The Winner Baseball Association is donating $5,000 and trying to raise $50,000 more in pledges for the first phase of the upgrade project before Monday’s city council meeting. If the money isn’t raised, the city will move forward with plans to tear down the remaining towers, eliminating night games.

Leahy, a native of O’Neill, Nebraska, coached Notre Dame in the 1940s and 1950s. His teams won five national championships.

– Associated Press

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