You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Business

  • Alibaba poised to surge on the NYSE
      NEW YORK – Chinese e-commerce powerhouse Alibaba will say “open sesame” to the New York Stock Exchange on Friday, as its shares begin trading in a highly anticipated debut that could raise up to $25 billion.
  • 56 million at risk in data theft
    NEW YORK – Home Depot said 56 million debit and credit cards are estimated to have been breached in a data theft between April and September at its stores in the U.S. and Canada.
  • Ellison stepping aside as Oracle CEO
    SAN FRANCISCO – Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison is stepping aside as CEO after 37 years at the helm of the business software maker, ending a colorful reign marked by his flamboyant behavior and outlandish wealth amassed while
Advertisement
Associated Press
A professional extractor examines a sheet of THC concentrate at Mahatma Concentrates, a marijuana business in Denver. Colorado is trying to create a financial system for the legalized marijuana industry.

Pot banking needs Fed’s OK

Colorado wants weed industry to create co-ops

– Frustrated by the cash-heavy aspect of its new marijuana industry, Colorado is trying a long-shot bid to create the world’s first financial system devoted to the pot business.

But Colorado’s plan to move the weed industry away from dank-smelling cash to easily auditable banking accounts is a Hail Mary pass that won’t work, industry and regulatory officials agree.

“It’s definitely creative, but I don’t know whether it’s a solution or just a statement,” said Toni Fox, owner of 3D Cannabis Center in Denver.

Here’s the plan approved by state lawmakers last week: State-licensed pot growers and sellers would pool their cash into uninsured financial cooperatives. The cooperatives would then ask the U.S. Federal Reserve System to let them access so-called merchant services, a broad category that includes accepting credit cards and being able to write checks.

The Federal Reserve had no immediate response to Colorado’s cooperative plan.

The cooperative stratagem is a response to marijuana guidance issued in February by the Treasury Department.

Marijuana shops in Colorado and elsewhere have been clamoring for access to traditional banks, complaining of dousing cash in air freshener to try to dupe banks. Others pile cash in self-storage units or safety deposit boxes, requiring frequent trips to exchange the cash for money orders to pay employees and utility bills.

But the Treasury’s guidance was met with a shrug by many banks, which generally considered the elaborate reporting requirements associated with marijuana customers too onerous to bother with.

Instead, Colorado authorities hope the Federal Reserve will allow new marijuana co-ops to access merchant services if the co-ops agree to bear all the cost of complying with the marijuana banking guidance, as well as assuming all the risk.

It sounds like a long shot, even to pot industry workers.

“I don’t see it,” said Shawn Coleman, a Denver-based lobbyist who represents marijuana retailers. “The administration has gone as far as they possibly could to help the marijuana industry without an act of Congress.”

And despite complaints from banking groups and pot shops about the Treasury’s pot guidance, there are signs that the guidelines are working for some. And a handful of small credit unions in Colorado and Washington state do serve marijuana clients, though many won’t talk publicly about it.

Asked whether he’d advise his clients to consider an uninsured financial co-op as an alternative to constantly skipping around from bank to bank, Coleman didn’t hesitate. “Absolutely not,” he said.

For example, Fox’s Denver dispensary has never lost an account with the bank she has had since she owned a landscaping company before Colorado’s retail medical marijuana industry took off in 2009. She just won’t tell a reporter which bank it is.

Her bank didn’t pull her account after the February guidance, but Fox said her bank did increase her fees. She simply pays it.

“We would pay whatever it took to have financial security,” Fox said.

The architects of Colorado’s marijuana banking gambit concede that it’s far from certain whether cannabis-specific cooperatives would ever get off the ground. But they say the bill’s passage should at least signal to banks and federal regulators that the marijuana industry is willing to go to great lengths for consistent banking services.

“I hope, at least in the short term, this will show the banks that this is a legitimate business,” said Brian Vicente, a Denver attorney who advises marijuana clients in regulation and banking compliance.

Washington state is closely watching Colorado’s banking plan, said Scott Jarvis, director of Washington’s Department of Financial Institutions. But it will still require action by the Federal Reserve.

“That’s been the mystery all along,” Jarvis said. “If it’s allowed, it could all happen.”

A few banks or credit unions in Washington plan to do business with licensed marijuana growers and processors, he said, but it will be extremely difficult for pot shops to obtain even basic checking accounts.

That’s because institutions believe it’s harder to monitor retailers in compliance with Treasury Department guidelines than it is to monitor processors and growers.

Advertisement