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Hunting guide outfitter arrested

The operator of a hunting guide service is facing multiple charges, accused of setting up a three-day wild turkey hunt for two northeast Indiana men without getting permission from the landowner.

Indiana conservation officers said Terry Malone II, 35, of Terre Haute, operator of Buck Creek Outfitters, is facing two felony counts of theft, two misdemeanor counts of criminal trespass and two misdemeanor counts of hunting without consent of the landowner.

Conservation officers said Malone received $1,050 from the Wolcottville and Kendallville men in exchange for the April hunt which was to include finding the hunting location, guide service and lodging.

The men were accompanied by Malone’s hunting guide, a 23-year-old New Haven man, on land north of Terre Haute owned by Peabody Coal Co. and leased for farming by Marrs Farms, conservation officers said.

Both companies contend that no one had permission to hunt on or use the property.

Malone, who was arrested Wednesday, has similar charges pending in Sullivan County and has had recent convictions relating to wildlife crimes in other courts, conservation officers said.

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