You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

World

  • Government-held Ukraine town hit by rebel shells
    A town in east Ukraine came under shellfire by pro-Russian rebels on Wednesday, amid fears that they are launching a counter-offensive on government-held parts of the region.
  • Malaysia Airlines set for shakeup after disasters
    Malaysia is preparing to unveil the latest overhaul of its beleaguered state-owned airline, which is reeling from twin disasters months apart that killed hundreds of passengers.
  • Japan PM sent prayer note to war criminal ceremony
    Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe earlier this year sent a note to a temple ceremony honoring hundreds of World War II-era war criminals praising their contributions to the country, a top government spokesman said Wednesday.
Advertisement
Vadim Ghirda | AP
A man breaks down in tears while passing by the coffin of pro-Russian activist Andrei Brazhevskiy during his funeral in Odessa, Ukraine, on Wednesday. Brazhevskiy, 27, died jumping out of a burning trade union building Friday.

Putin claims troops have pulled back from Ukraine border

MOSCOW – Russia has pulled back its troops from the Ukrainian border, Vladimir Putin told diplomats Wednesday as he urged insurgents in southeast Ukraine to postpone their planned referendum Sunday on autonomy.

In a Moscow meeting with Swiss president Didier Burkhalter, Putin said the Russian troops have been pulled back to their training grounds and locations for “regular exercises,” but didn’t specify whether those locations were in areas near Ukraine.

Putin also called on Ukraine’s military to halt all operations against pro-Russia activists who have seized government buildings and police stations in at least a dozen towns in eastern Ukraine.

Ukraine launched a government offensive late last week to take back buildings and towns under control of the insurgents. At least 35 people, including many rebels, have died in that offensive, the government said.

Many had feared that Sunday’s vote on more autonomy would be a flashpoint for further violence between the rebels and Ukrainian troops in the east. Russia annexed the Ukrainian Black Sea peninsula of Crimea in March after residents held a vote and overwhelmingly backed secession.

“We believe that the most important thing is to create direct, full-fledged dialogue between the Kiev authorities and representatives of southeast Ukraine,” Putin said. “Because of this, we ask that representatives of southeast Ukraine, supporters of federalization in the country. Postpone the May 11 referendum in order to create the necessary conditions for such a dialogue.”

Despite Putin’s comments, pro-Russia militants calling themselves the Donetsk People’s Republic said they would still carry out the referendum on Sunday.

Putin also described Ukraine’s May 25 presidential election as a move “in the right direction,” and said his talk with Burkhalter, who is chairman-in-office for the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, encouraged him that “our approaches (to Ukraine) coincide.”

The Russian leader still repeated Russia’s long-held stance that constitutional reforms must precede any nationwide vote in Ukraine.

In Berlin, a leading Ukrainian presidential candidate said he was prepared to negotiate a decentralization of power as pro-Russia insurgents in the east have demanded.

But Petro Poroshenko, a billionaire chocolate magnate, added that some insurgents in the eastern region understand only “the language of force.”

Peter Leonard in Donetsk, Ukraine contributed to this report.

Advertisement