You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

TV

  • 'Pemberley' actors tread carefully
    LOS ANGELES – Actors generally are eager for work and a challenge, but Matthew Rhys and Anna Maxwell Martin admit they were skittish about taking on the lead characters of “Pride and Prejudice.
  • 'Roosevelts' snags big ratings for PBS
    NEW YORK – Ken Burns’ series “The Roosevelts” earned PBS its biggest audience in two decades, making it the documentary maker’s third most popular film after “The Civil War” and “Lewis & Clark:
  • Fall TV Scorecard
    The fall TV season, which featured a relatively small number of new shows, is slightly more than a month old, and so far, the broadcast networks have been tight-lipped on the futures of most new series.
Advertisement
Fox
Homer Simpson as a Lego character

Simpsons step into Lego land

– Episode No. 550 of Fox’s “The Simpsons” was put together Lego brick by brick, in a CGI manner of speaking.

Using computer-generated special effects, the town of Springfield and its residents have been reimagined in the style of the famed plastic toys for Sunday’s episode, “Brick Like Me.”

It’s a tart title – a play on “Black Like Me,” the book – for a sweet episode, one that combines CGI and the show’s traditional animation to shake up Homer Simpson’s world and teach him a lesson about parenting.

Homer (voiced by Dan Castellaneta) has morphed from his familiar pudgy self into a real hard-body: a square-shaped, bullet-headed Lego man. He’s still yellow, as are wife Marge (Julie Kavner), the kids and the rest of the town’s inhabitants, but all easily and painlessly disassembled.

With the box-office hit “The Lego Movie,” a newly launched “Simpsons” Lego toy line and now the TV episode, it could be suspected that much corporate plotting was involved.

“People are probably looking at it going, ‘All this fits and it’s a plan.’ No, it was just the love of Lego” and creativity, not cross-promotion, Al Jean, “The Simpsons” longtime executive producer, told a teleconference this week.

“Yes, so all the cross-promotion was just gravy, delicious gravy,” joked Matt Selman, an executive producer and co-writer, with Brian Kelley, of the Lego episode.

Advertisement