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Vermont passes GMO-labeling bill

– Vermont lawmakers have passed the country’s first state bill to require the labeling of genetically modified foods, underscoring a division between powerful lobbyists for the U.S. food industry and an American public that overwhelmingly says it approves of the idea.

The Vermont House approved the measure Wednesday, about a week after the state Senate, and Gov. Peter Shumlin said he plans to sign it. The requirements would take effect July 1, 2016, giving food producers time to comply.

Shumlin praised the vote. “I am proud of Vermont for being the first state in the nation to ensure that Vermonters will know what is in their food,” he said in a statement.

Genetically modified organisms – often used in crop plants – have been changed at their genetic roots to be resistant to insects, germs or herbicides.

The development in Vermont is important because it now puts the U.S. on the map of governments taking a stance against a practice that has led to bountiful crops and food production but has stirred concerns about the dominance of big agribusiness and the potential for unforeseen effects on the natural environment. Some scientists and activists worry about potential effects on soil health and pollination of neighboring crops.

Twenty-nine other states have proposed bills this year and last to require genetically modified organism – or GMO – labeling, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. The European Union already has restricted the regulation, labeling and sale of GMO foods.

Several credible polls have found that Americans overwhelmingly favor the notion of labeling genetically modified foods.

Organic farmers and others are praising Vermont’s move, while the Grocery Manufacturers Association, a group in Washington that represents food producers, called it a step in the wrong direction.

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