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Myanmar journalist Win Tin dies at 85

Win Tin

– Win Tin, a prominent journalist who became Myanmar’s longest-serving political prisoner after challenging military rule by co-founding the National League for Democracy, died today. He was 85.

He had been hospitalized with respiratory problems since March 12 and died at Yangon General Hospital.

A former newspaper editor, Win Tin was a close aide to opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, another founder in 1988 of the pro-democracy party. In 1989, she was put under house arrest, and Win Tin was sent to prison for his political activities. His sentence was extended twice for various reasons, the second time for writing a letter to the United Nations.

“He was a great pillar of strength. His demise at this important political juncture of transition is a great loss not only to the NLD but also to the country. We are deeply saddened,” said Nyan Win, a spokesman of National League for Democracy.

While incarcerated, he received several international press freedom awards but also suffered from ill health, including heart problems, high blood pressure and inflammation of the spine. In his book titled “What’s that? A human hell,” published in 2010, Win Tin gave a vivid description of prison life – how he endured torture, was denied medical care and fed only rice and boiled vegetables.

Freed in a general amnesty of prisoners in 2008, he continued working with the NLD through Myanmar’s transition from military rule to an elected – although army-dominated – government in 2011. He continued to call on the military to relinquish power, saying democracy will never come to Myanmar as long as the military continued to dominate the political landscape. He also started a foundation to give assistance to current and former political prisoners.

After Win Tin was released from prison, he kept wearing his blue prison shirt as a sign of protest against military rule.

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