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Associated Press
A Boston police officer walks with his bomb detection canine Wednesday in preparation for the Boston Marathon on Monday.

Boston confident of a safe marathon

Backpack scare steps up security for Monday race

– The arrest of a man with a rice cooker in his backpack near the Boston Marathon finish line led police to step up patrols Wednesday, while organizers sought to assure the city and runners of a safe race next week.

The actions of the man, whose mother said he had a mental disorder, rattled nerves as Boston prepared for the annual race, but authorities said they did not consider it a security breach. Officials also expressed confidence in heightened security measures for Monday’s event while acknowledging the challenge of protecting an estimated 1 million spectators and 36,000 runners across 26.2 miles and eight Massachusetts communities.

Security plans include thousands of uniformed police, hundreds of plainclothes officers and about 100 strategically positioned video cameras that will monitor the crowds. Police also strongly discouraged spectators from bringing backpacks.

“I believe this will be the safest place on the planet on April 21,” said Dave McGillivray, longtime race director for the Boston Athletic Association.

Boston police detonated the suspicious backpack Tuesday night, along with a second backpack that was later found to have been left behind by a journalist covering the day’s remembrances, Police Commissioner William Evans said.

Neither bag was determined to have explosives.

Kevin Edson, 25, was arraigned Wednesday on several charges including threatening battery and possession of a hoax device. Bail was set at $100,000, and a judge ordered that Edson be evaluated at a state psychiatric hospital.

Joie Edson said her son had battled bipolar disorder for many years and that his mental state had recently deteriorated.

The finish line on Boylston Street, where twin bombs killed three people and injured more than 260 others last year, will not be closed to the public until the morning of the race, Evans said, but police plan to increase visibility in the area over the next several days.

In seeking to discourage spectators from bringing backpacks, police said those carrying them are likely to have them searched.

“This year, we can all understand that someone is going to feel anxious, nervous, to stand next to someone with a backpack,” said Kurt Schwartz, the state’s undersecretary of public safety. “Why do that this year?”

Spectators were advised to tell a police officer or call 911 if they see anything they consider suspicious along the route.

Evans said undercover officers with special training will be working the crowds looking for suspicious packages or anyone “who might be up to no good.” He also said police will limit the size of the crowds on Boylston Street, and if it appears to grow too large, people will be asked to move to other areas to view the race. But he added that police do not want to create undue anxiety, either.

“We are not going to scare people and make it look like it’s an armed camp,” he said.

The bombs at last year’s marathon were made from pressure cookers hidden in backpacks, authorities said. Lawyers for the surviving bombing suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, were in federal court Wednesday arguing that the government should not be allowed to monitor prison visits from the defendant’s two sisters.

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