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Lost Texas dog found at Ohio shelter
HAMILTON, Ohio – A small dog that escaped its fenced-in yard in Texas was found outside a southwest Ohio animal shelter, and its owners have no idea how he traveled more than 1,000 miles in a few days.
The 3-year-old Chihuahua-dachshund mix named Corbin dug a hole under a fence in his backyard in Killeen, Texas, on March 25. He was found Saturday tied to a bench outside the animal shelter in Hamilton, about 30 miles north of Cincinnati.
A surveillance camera at the Animal Friends Humane Society in Hamilton recorded a woman leaving Corbin at the shelter late Friday night. Staff found him the next day.
Associated Press
Pet owner Steve Greig found 10-year-old Phyllis on Erin O’Sullivan’s “Susie’s Senior Dogs” Facebook page. He took her in because he didn’t think she would be adopted.

Facebook effort finding senior dogs new homes

– Erin O’Sullivan wants to change lives by finding new homes for old dogs.

Visitors to her popular Facebook page say she has done just that by helping them discover the pets they didn’t know they were missing. O’Sullivan’s page tells stories about pooches past their prime that need loving homes and taps into the wellspring of animal lovers seeking calmer, well-trained dogs or those wanting to care for pets in their twilight years.

Shelters will ask her to help place older dogs that aren’t as sought-after as puppies, many of which have extensive health problems that can stall adoptions.

“I think more than food or water, companionship is lifeblood to a dog,” O’Sullivan said. She is convinced that when an older dog is adopted, they will live longer because of an owner’s love.

Many shelters and rescues online and off focus on senior dog adoptions that are growing in popularity. But O’Sullivan’s page, Susie’s Senior Dogs, has gotten more attention than most thanks to a big boost from her boyfriend, an Internet star who knows how to build buzz online – and owns a dog named Susie.

Brandon Stanton of Brooklyn is the author of a book and much-read blog called “Humans of New York,” which claims more than 4 million followers on social media and chronicles the lives of New Yorkers, enrapturing overtaxed Web surfers with heartfelt photos and snippets of text.

Three years ago, Stanton adopted an 11-year-old Chihuahua named Susie.

O’Sullivan had set up a Facebook page for Susie, which had about 10,000 “likes” the morning she changed its purpose to finding other old dogs new homes.

Stanton pitched the page on his blog, and by nightfall the page had 10 times as many followers. That number has since grown to over 150,000, and she has helped nearly 200 dogs since January.

Steve Greig, who owns a menagerie of animals, found a 10-year-old dog to love on O’Sullivan’s page, but the nearly hairless Chihuahua-poodle mix named Phyllis also came with problems.

The dog is blind, weak, had sores on her face from trying to escape her cage, and lost all her hair to an infection, Greig said. In February, he took in Phyllis because he didn’t have hope she would be adopted from a shelter otherwise.

“She looks like a fox with a bad perm,” he said, but that hasn’t bothered his dogs, cats, chickens, ducks or pot-bellied pig. “The other dogs must realize the 10-year-old Chihuahua-poodle is blind and feeble. They are so gentle with her. She’s fitting in fine.”

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