You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Business

  • Wright timepieces capture a piece of flight history
    OAKWOOD, Ohio – Wright Brothers USA LLC, the Dayton company controlling the new Wright family brand, has unveiled luxury watches incorporating the Wright trademark, as well as a bit of wing cloth from the 1903 Wright Flyer.
  • Health care's big deal
    In a big year for deal-making, the health care industry is a standout.Large drugmakers are buying and selling businesses to control costs and deploy surplus cash.
  • Target facing crucial holiday test in Canada
    MINNEAPOLIS – Target Corp. botched its first impression in Canada so badly that some shoppers inverted its motto to “Expect less, pay more.
Advertisement

LinkedIn boss tops best CEO list

– Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer may have put the kibosh on working from home last year and received attention for a performance review system that ranked employees on a curve – just as Microsoft was dumping that much-hated approach.

But that hasn’t stopped her from getting a 79 percent approval rating from Yahoo employees, making her one of two female chief executives to place among the 50 most popular CEOs of large U.S. companies, according to Glassdoor.

The career website has put out its 2014 listing of the country’s best-rated CEOs, according to ratings that were part of company reviews on Glassdoor over the past 12 months.

Mayer came in 49th, barely squeaking into the top 50, but she’s in good company. The top five include the list’s No. 1, LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner (who clocked a 100 percent rating), as well as Ford’s Alan Mulally (No. 2, 97 percent) and Costco’s Craig Jelinek (No. 5, 95 percent).

Last year’s No. 1, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, fell to No. 9 this year; the biggest climber on the list was Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein, who rose from No. 37 in 2013 to No. 7 this year. He scored a 93 percent rating, slightly above the 88 percent average of the top 50 companies.

Given how little most Americans think of business leaders – a 2013 Pew Research Center survey found just 24 percent think business executives offer “a lot” to society – that’s a pretty high grade. Only one in five people, according to a 2014 report by the public relations firm Edelman, trusts corporate leaders to tell the truth and make ethical and moral decisions. Employees may give their own CEOs higher ratings because they know them well – or despite the fact that they don’t.

“Many times, employees have never met the CEO, so are basically judging them on their leadership of the company,” said Scott Dobroski, Glassdoor’s community expert.

Advertisement