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  • Reports: China body-searched 10,000 pigeons
      BEIJING – The 10,000 pigeons released in a ceremony Wednesday for China’s National Day underwent unusual scrutiny, each having its feathers and anus checked for dangerous materials, state-run media reports said,
  • 10 things to know
     Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:  1.
  • 10 things to know
     Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:  1.
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Associated Press
The shadow of a man using his mobile phone falls on a board with the characters "Pray for MH370 safe return" meant for relatives and workers to write their prayers and well wishes in a room reserved for relatives of Chinese passengers aboard the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in Beijing, China, Monday, March 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

10 Things to Know for Monday, March 24

Associated Press
U.S. President Barack Obama waves as he walks down the stairs from Air Force One upon arrival at Schiphol Amsterdam Airport, Netherlands, Monday March 24, 2014. Obama will attend the two-day Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, POOL)
Associated Press
A house is seen destroyed in the mud on Highway 530 next to mile marker 37 on Sunday, March 23, 2014, the day after a giant landslide occurred near mile marker 37 near Oso, Washington. The nearby Stillaguamish River has been dammed up by 15-20 feet of debris as a result, creating more flooding concerns, as reported by KING 5 via the state hydrologist. (AP Photo/The Seattle Times, Lindsey Wasson, Pool)
Associated Press
Jack Durney, mayor of Hoquiam, Wash., stands on a hill on Monday, March 18, 2014, overlooking his city, the Hoquiam River, and Grays Harbor. Because most of Hoquiam lies in the flood plain, Durney says possible increases in federal flood insurance rates would adversely affect many who live in his town. In the old logging port on an estuarine bay, the great majority of the 8,700 residents live in a flood hazard area. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Associated Press
Emergency crews work along a barge that spilled oil after it was struck by a ship near the Texas City Dike on Sunday, March 23, 2014, in Texas City. Dozens of ships are in evolved in clean-up efforts to remove up to 168,000 gallons of oil that make have spilled into Galveston Bay after a ship and barge collided near the Texas City dike on Saturday afternoon. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Smiley N. Pool)
Associated Press
Jessica Wilt checks her work tablet as she sits in shared office and meeting space, Wednesday March 12, 2014 in New York. Wilt, 37, a former professional tap dancer who has freelance jobs managing a children’s dance program and arts grant programs, thought premiums would be too costly, but went back and found she had erred in projecting her 2014 earnings, and qualified for a much bigger subsidy. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
Associated Press
FILE - In this May 22, 2013, customers enter and exit a Hobby Lobby store in Denver. The Obama administration and its opponents are renewing the Supreme Court battle over President Barack Obama’s health care law in a case that pits the religious rights of employers against the rights of women to the birth control of their choice. Two years after the entire law survived the justices’ review by a single vote, the court is hearing arguments on Tuesday in a religion-based challenge from family-owned companies that object to covering certain contraceptives in their health plans as part of the law’s preventive care requirement. The largest company among them, Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File)
Associated Press
In this Feb. 25, 2014 photo, third-graders, from left, Jan Carlos Medina, Matthew Velez and Natalie Mieses take in a class that teaches them about stroke on Feb. 25, 2014, at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx, N.Y. The hospital educates children to recognize stroke and get victims to a hospital quickly. (AP Photo/Jim Fitzgerald)
Associated Press
Luis Escamilla puts on gloves before cutting prosciutto at the Hock Farm Restaurant in Sacramento, Calif. at the Hock Farm restaurant in Sacramento, Calif. Under a bill signed last year by Gov. Jerry Brown, chefs and bartenders in California must keep bare hands off food going straight to the plate or the drink glass, and must use gloves or kitchen utensils such as tongs. California, where the law took effect Jan. 1 and will begin enforcement starting in July, will join 41 other states banning bare-hand contact with ready-to-eat food. In February,after receiving a petition from bartenders calling for an exemption for the "disposable glove law" the law's author, Assemblyman Richard Pan, D-Sacramento, a pediatrician, has introduced a bill to repeal the new regulation and revisit the entire issue.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
Associated Press
Kentucky forward Julius Randle (30) dunks the ball in second half action during a Third Round NCAA Tournament game between Wichita State and Kentucky on Sunday, March 23, 2014, at the Scottrade Center in St. Louis. At right is Kentucky guard Aaron Harrison (2). (AP Photo/ St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Chris Lee)

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. CHINESE PLANE SPOTS OBJECTS IN INDIAN OCEAN

The crew aboard an IL-76 plane saw two white, square-shaped pieces in an area identified by satellite imagery as containing possible debris from the missing Malaysian airliner.

2. WHAT OBAMA HOPES TO ACHIEVE ON EUROPEAN TRIP

The president begins a week of international travel in the Netherlands with Russia's Crimean incursion at the top of his agenda, even as he seeks to re-emphasize U.S. influence abroad.

3. NO 'SIGNS OF LIFE' AFTER HUGE WASHINGTON LANDSLIDE

Hopes of finding any more survivors from a massive mudslide that killed at least eight people wane as searchers pull more bodies from the debris field.

4. WHY FLOOD-PRONE AREAS COULD SEE SPIKE IN PREMIUMS

AP's David Caruso finds more than a million policyholders could face trouble in the future from the rising cost of government-mandated flood insurance.

5. WHAT'S NEXT AFTER TEXAS OIL SPILL

No timetable has been set to reopen the Houston Ship Channel after a "significant" oil spill, but help is on the way to contain it and protect important shorebird habitat.

6. WHAT'S KEEPING SOME FROM 'OBAMACARE' ENROLLMENT

Many of the uninsured still don't know much about the health overhaul and its March 31 deadline for signing up in plans that can yield discounts, researchers say.

7. SUPREME COURT TO WEIGH IN ON BIRTH CONTROL CASE

Justices will hear arguments this week in a religion-based challenge from family-owned companies that object to providing contraceptives in their health plans.

8. HOW KIDS ARE LEARNING SIGNS OF STROKE

In an experimental New York City program, students make funny faces and speak gibberish as part of a serious lesson to help them understand the telltale clues of a stroke.

9. IN CALIFORNIA, CHEFS FIGHT FOR GLOVELESS CONTACT

State lawmakers are considering a reversal of a law that would require chefs and bartenders to keep bare hands off food and drinks.

10. KENTUCKY ENDS WICHITA STATE'S PURSUIT OF PERFECTION

Andrew Harrison scores 20 points as the Wildcats hold off the top-seeded Shockers 78-76 to advance to the Sweet 16 of the NCAA tournament.

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