You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Business

  • Macy's to settle racial-profile case
    ALBANY, N.Y. – Macy’s will pay $650,000 to settle allegations of racial profiling at its flagship store in Manhattan’s Herald Square.
  • Nook gets tablet redesign
    NEW YORK – Barnes & Noble and Samsung have un­veiled a reading-focused tab­let that will replace the book­seller’s own Nook tablets.
  • Apple stock hits new high
    SAN FRANCISCO – Apple’s stock touched a new high Wednesday, reflecting investors’ renewed faith in CEO Tim Cook’s ability to outwit the competition and expand the technological hit factory built by the late Steve
Advertisement
Briefs

200,000 bitcoins reappear

Bankrupt bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox said it found 200,000 bitcoins, which were previously thought stolen, in disused electronic wallets. An additional 650,000 bitcoins remain unaccounted for.

The Tokyo-based company said in a statement posted on its website Thursday that the 200,000 bitcoins were identified March 7 after “old format” wallets were searched as part of Mt. Gox’s bankruptcy proceedings.

The online exchange for the virtual currency was unplugged in February as rumors of its insolvency swirled, adding to doubts about the viability of bitcoins.

It then filed for bankruptcy protection in Tokyo and said nearly all its 850,000 bitcoins were missing, most likely as a result of theft. About 750,000 of the bitcoins belonged to people who used the Mt. Gox exchange.

At current prices, the rediscovered bitcoins have a market value of about $120 million.

The restoration of some of the missing virtual currency is potentially good news for those who invested at Mt. Gox but raises further questions about the running of the exchange.

Nine activists plead not guilty in P&G fight

Defense attorneys including a veteran First Amendment lawyer entered not-guilty pleas Friday for nine Greenpeace activists facing felony charges after a daring demonstration at Procter & Gamble Co. headquarters in Cincinnati.

They were arrested March 4 after protesting the consumer products company’s use of palm oil from a supplier Greenpeace says is tied to tropical forest destruction. Protesters slipped past security and used zip lines to unfurl giant banners from P&G’s two towers, while a helicopter filmed the protest.

A Hamilton County grand jury indicted them on burglary and vandalism counts carrying possible sentences of nine-plus years in prison and $20,000 in fines with convictions.

Wendy’s to start its mobile payment plan

Wendy’s is rolling out a program that lets customers pay using their smartphones, following a similar plan unveiled by Burger King this week.

The Wendy’s Co., based in Dublin, Ohio, has been testing the mobile payment option during the past year and said the majority of its roughly 5,800 U.S. locations are ready to accept the payments.

The move reflects a push by fast-food chains to court younger customers by tapping into the attachment they have to their phones.

“If they want to come in and give us business, we want to allow them to pay the way they want to pay,” said Craig Bahner, Wendy’s chief marketing officer.

Advertisement