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Associated Press
The Google barge makes its way Thursday to its new berth in the Port of Stockton in California.

Google’s barge parks in Stockton port

– Google’s mystery barge floated last week to its new home in the California delta after the Internet company was ordered to move it from San Francisco.

The odd-looking, four-story vessel made of recycled shipping containers departed from Treasure Island to comply with a Jan. 31 regulatory order concluding that Google Inc. didn’t have the proper permits to build it there.

Construction stopped on the project late last year.

Google says the barge will serve as an interactive technology center when it’s done.

Various alternative theories have been floated about its purpose, however. Among the most popular have been that Google is building a party boat, roaming data center or aquatic store.

The vessel’s new home will be Stockton, a city about 80 miles east of San Francisco on the Sacramento-San Joaquin River delta. The Port of Stockton falls outside the jurisdiction of the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission, the agency that forced the barge to leave Treasure Island.

“It was an exciting morning for us,” said Port of Stockton Director Richard Aschieris. “This doesn’t happen every day. In fact I would probably say this is, from a maritime point of view, the highest-visibility vessel we may have ever hosted.”

Unlike San Francisco, Stockton has never been a major tourist attraction. The city of roughly 300,000 people fell on such tough times that it filed for bankruptcy in 2012 and is still trying to reorganize its finances under court supervision.

Google’s representatives signed an agreement that will allow the barge to be moored in Stockton for six months, Aschieris said. The attention and intrigue surrounding the barge has been a source of amusement for Google, which issued a playful statement about its new berth.

“It’s been a busy six months for our barge, and it’s grown tired of all the attention,” Google joked. “So we are moving it to Stockton where it can have a break, enjoy the city’s delicious asparagus, warmer climate and get a bit of rest before its next chapter.”

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