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A diver swims with a GoPro attached to her head. GoPro Inc. makes a line of high-definition video cameras geared toward extreme sports athletes.

IPO looming for GoPro, extreme athletes’ camera

– GoPro isn’t exactly a household name, but anyone who’s spent a little time on YouTube is surely familiar with the thousands of snowboarding, surfing and even skateboarding baby videos that its cameras produce.

GoPro Inc., which makes a small line of high-definition video cameras geared toward extreme sports athletes, is experiencing a rare moment in the spotlight.

The San Mateo, Calif., company was a common sight at the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, showing up in everything from the opening ceremony to test runs of ski and snowboarding courses. It currently sponsors the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association and champion snowboarder Shaun White.

And now GoPro is preparing to enter the high-profile area of public companies. Last month, it announced plans for an initial public offering of common stock.

The company’s cameras, which sell for between $200 and $400, are small, light, water resistant and extremely durable. The highest-end GoPro model shoots video in ultra-high-definition, or 4K.

With a variety of related accessories such as helmet attachments, bike mounts and harnesses, the cameras can be mounted to everything from a bike helmet to the side of a half pipe.

Those attributes make GoPro a favorite of extreme athletes. The company was founded more than a decade ago by avid surfer and CEO Nicholas Woodman. The cameras’ most popular use: the ultimate selfie, a one-of-a-kind first-person point of view, even if the person starring in the video happens to be hang-gliding off a cliff or parachuting from a giant helium balloon.

Through its sponsorships, GoPro gets one-of-a-kind content. Its YouTube channel has about 1.7 million subscribers and features hundreds of eye-popping videos starring everyday users and famous people such as GoPro-sponsored surfing legend Kelly Slater.

Citing legal restrictions related to the IPO, company officials declined to comment for this story.

One challenge for GoPro as a public company will be to broaden the appeal of its cameras.

There is potential to attract more consumers given the current consumer craze surrounding wearable technologies, says Whitney Fishman, senior director of innovation and consumer technology at media agency MEC.

It’s also possible, Fishman believes, that the cameras could find commercial use in fields such as medicine.

Jason Stein, founder and president of the New York-based social media agency Laundry Service, argues that GoPro’s true value lies not in its camera, but in the exclusive content the gadgets creates. He predicts that as a result of its online publicity, GoPro will eventually become more of a media company than a manufacturer.

“I think it always comes back to content creation,” Stein says. “Content is the key to becoming a successful media company and they have content that no one else has.”

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