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AP | Pavel Golovkin
Ukraine's fugitive President Viktor Yanukovych speaks at a news conference Friday as journalists raise their hands to ask questions in Rostov-on-Don, a city in southern Russia about 600 miles from Moscow.

Yanukovych says he’ll fight but won’t ask for military assistance

ROSTOV-ON-DON, Russia – Making his first public appearance since fleeing Ukraine, fugitive Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych pledged Friday to fight for his country’s future but said he will not ask for military assistance.

“I intend to keep fighting for the future of Ukraine,” he told a news conference Friday in the southern Russian city of Rostov-on-Don. Yanukovych had not been seen since Saturday as he lost his grip on power.

Yanukovych said he supports Crimea’s residents who are worried about “nationalists” in Kiev but that use of force is “unacceptable.”

“Any military action in this situation is unacceptable,” he said.

Yanukovych insisted he “did not flee anywhere” but left for the city of Kharkiv in eastern Ukraine. He said he was “forced” to leave the country when he was in Crimea after his family received threats. Asked how he managed to get to Russia, the fugitive president said he got out “thanks to patriotic officers who did their duty and helped me to save my life.”

Yanukovych said he had not met Russian President Vladimir Putin in Russia but talked with him on the phone, adding that he hopes the Russian leader will find time to meet him.

The Ukrainian president lambasted the West for allegedly betraying a Feb. 21 compromise agreement between the government and the opposition, saying that recent actions by the opposition run counter to the EU-brokered pact.

Meanwhile, a top Ukrainian security official said two airports in Crimea were under Ukrainian control despite attempts by gunmen to “seize” them.

Ukraine’s Interior Minister said earlier Friday that Russian navy troops were blocking access to the airports in Simferopol and Sevastopol, describing it as a “military invasion and occupation.”

But Ukraine’s Security Council Chief Andriy Parubiy insisted later that the airports were still under Ukrainian control, according to the Interfax news agency.

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