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Associated Press
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel outlines on Monday plans to cut the size of the military.

US forces reshaping for future

Smaller but more high tech

– Looking beyond America’s post-9/11 wars, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel on Monday proposed shrinking the Army to its smallest size in 74 years, closing bases and reshaping forces to confront a “more volatile, more unpredictable” world with a more nimble military.

The nation can afford a smaller military so long as it retains a technological edge and the agility to respond on short notice to crises anywhere on the globe, Hagel said. He said the priorities he outlined reflect a consensus view among America’s military leaders, but Republicans in Congress were quick to criticize some proposed changes.

In a speech at the one-year mark of his tenure as Pentagon chief, Hagel revealed many details of the defense spending plan that will be part of the 2015 budget that President Barack Obama will submit to Congress next week. Hagel described it as the first Pentagon budget to fully reflect the nation’s transition from 13 years of war.

At the core of his plan is the notion that after wars in Iraq and Afghanistan that proved longer and more costly than foreseen, the U.S. military will no longer be sized to conduct large and protracted ground wars. It will put more emphasis on versatile, agile forces that can project power over great distances, including in Asia.

Hagel stressed that such changes entail risk. He said, “We are entering an era where American dominance on the seas, in the skies and in space can no longer be taken for granted.”

However, budget constraints demand that spending be managed differently from the past, with an eye to cutting costs across a wide front, including in areas certain to draw opposition in the Congress, he said.

He proposed, for example, a variety of changes in military compensation, including smaller pay raises, a slowdown in the growth of tax-free housing allowances and a requirement that retirees and some families of active-duty service members pay a little more in health insurance deductibles and co-pays.

“Although these recommendations do not cut anyone’s pay, I realize they will be controversial,” Hagel said, adding that the nation cannot afford the escalating cost of military pay and benefit packages that were enacted during the war years.

“If we continue on the current course without making these modest adjustments now, the choices will only grow more difficult and painful down the road,” he said.

Although Congress has agreed on an overall number for the military budget in fiscal 2015 – just under $500 billion – there are still major decisions to be made on how that money should be spent.

Early reaction from Republicans in Congress was negative.

“I am concerned that we are on a path to repeat the mistakes we’ve made during past attempts to cash in on expected peace dividends that never materialized,” said Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, a possible presidential contender in 2016.

“What we’re trying to do is solve our financial problems on the backs of our military, and that can’t be done,” said Rep. Howard “Buck” McKeon of California, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee.

Another proposal likely to draw fire on Capitol Hill is Hagel’s call for a new round of domestic military base closings in 2017.

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