You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

U.S.

  • Miss America admits she was forced out of sorority
    Miss America says she was removed from her college sorority over a letter that made light of hazing, but she denies a report that she was involved in aggressively hazing fellow students.
  • Federal prison population drops by nearly 5,000
    The federal prison population has dropped in the last year by roughly 4,800, the first time in decades that the inmate count has gone down, according to the Justice Department.
  • Rights of same-sex military spouses vary by state
     JACKSONVILLE, N.C. – On the wall over her bunk in Kuwait, Marine Cpl. Nivia Huskey proudly displays a collection of sonogram printouts of the baby boy her pregnant spouse is carrying back home in North Carolina.
Advertisement

Pipe cause of deadly leak in NY

– A faulty water heater flue pipe caused the carbon monoxide leak that killed a New York restaurant manager and sent more than two dozen people to hospitals, a fire official said Sunday.

Huntington Chief Fire Marshal Terence McNally said the fumes were circulated in the basement by the ventilation systems at the Legal Sea Foods restaurant at the Walt Whitman Shops on Long Island.

Restaurant manager Steven Nelson, 55, of Copiague, was found unresponsive in the basement on Saturday night and pronounced dead at a hospital.

Roger Berkowitz, president and CEO of Legal Sea Foods, said the carbon monoxide leak was “a wakeup call for commercial businesses” and that monitors should be in all businesses.

Authorities initially went to the restaurant after receiving a call about a woman who had fallen and hit her head in the basement. Rescue workers who arrived at the scene started to feel lightheaded and nauseated and suspected a carbon monoxide leak, officials said.

The restaurant was evacuated and 27 people were treated at hospitals. All of those affected by the fumes were restaurant employees, police or ambulance workers.

The building was not required to have carbon monoxide detectors, and there were none, McNally said.

Carbon monoxide is odorless and colorless and can lead to death by suffocation.

Advertisement