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Ukraine president, protesters agree to truce as fears mount

– Ukraine’s protest leaders and the president they aim to oust called a truce Wednesday, just hours after the military raised fears of a widespread crackdown with a vow to defeat “terrorists” responsible for seizing weapons and burning down buildings.

The two sides agreed to negotiate in an effort to end the violence that left at least 26 people dead and more than 400 injured on Tuesday. Protesters say the casualty toll is substantially higher.

The intense clashes between police and protesters led President Viktor Yanukovych to declare that the military would take part in a “national anti-terrorist operation.” The parameters weren’t specified, but the military’s involvement and Yanukovych’s appointment of a new military chief of staff fueled new worries.

As protective fires blazed around the tent camp in Kiev for a second night and protesters defending it showed no signs of yielding, Yanukovych met with top opposition leaders. A statement on his website said they had agreed on a truce and negotiations.

Vitali Klitschko, a leader of the protests that have sought to keep Ukraine open to Europe and out of a close alliance with Russia, said Yanukovych assured them that police would not storm the protesters’ encampment on Kiev’s Independence Square, according to the Interfax news agency.

The brief statement on the president’s website did not give details of what terms a truce would entail or how it would be implemented. Nor did it specify how the negotiations would be conducted or give an indication of how they would be different from previous meetings of the president and the opposition leaders.

Perhaps crucially, there was no immediate indication of whether radical elements among the protesters would observe the truce or be mollified by negotiations.

The two sides are locked in a battle over the identity of this nation of 46 million, whose loyalties are divided between Russia and the West.

Political and diplomatic maneuvering has continued, with both Moscow and the West eager to gain influence over this former Soviet republic. Three EU foreign ministers – from Germany, France and Poland – were heading to Kiev today to speak with both sides before an emergency EU meeting in Brussels to consider sanctions against those responsible for the recent violence.

President Barack Obama also stepped in to condemn the violence, warning Wednesday “there will be consequences” for Ukraine if it continues. The U.S. has raised the prospect of joining with the EU to impose sanctions against Ukraine.

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