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Furthermore …

World’s interest in Greenland growing

File this in your Be Aware folder:

The next big rush for natural resources will probably take place in Greenland, the largest island in the world with 24,000 miles of coastline and 56,000 people, almost all of whom live in one of the coastal settlements. It is a self-governing Danish province, but many are seeking independence.

And global warming is going to change this remote island forever. The people there will soon be bracing for tens of thousands of foreign workers.

“The shock will be profound,” the prime minister, Aleqa Hammond, said of the scattered communities that have heretofore lived by hunting and fishing. “But we have faced colonization, epidemics and modernization before. The decision we are making will have enormous impact on lifestyles and our indigenous culture.

“But we have always come out on top,” Hammond told The Guardian. “We are vulnerable, but we know how to adapt.”

Maybe, maybe not. The United States, Britain, China, Russia, Japan, South Korea and other countries have staked claims for resources. Hammond’s government, according to The Guardian, has awarded 120 licenses to explore areas now accessible because of the retreating ice cap.

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