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Associated Press
Workers assemble VW Passats at the automaker’s plant in Chattanooga, Tenn. The plant is voting on whether to unionize.

VW workers vote on joining UAW

– Workers at Volkswagen’s lone U.S. plant in Tennessee on Wednesday kicked off a three-day election that will determine whether they will be represented by the United Auto Workers.

If the union succeeds, the Chattanooga plant would become the first among foreign automakers in the South to unionize.

A loss for the UAW would deal a severe setback for the union that has staked its future on organizing workers at plants outside of Detroit’s Big Three.

The Chattanooga plant is alone among Volkswagen’s major factories around the world without formal worker representation.

The vote presents the UAW’s best chance among the foreign transplants, because the corporate structure of the German automaker favors the creation of works councils, in which blue-collar and salaried employees together have a say in working conditions at the plant.

The company has said that under U.S. law, it can’t create the domestic auto industry’s first works council without the establishment of a union at the plant.

In the interest of gaining a foothold at Volkswagen, the UAW signed an agreement with the company that it would “delegate functions and responsibilities ordinarily belonging to a union to a plant works council” if it wins this week’s vote.

The prospect of unionization is dreaded by Republican politicians in the state, who say they worry about losing a competitive edge in drawing manufacturing jobs to Tennessee.

Republican U.S. Sen. Bob Corker, a former Chattanooga mayor who played a key role in bringing Volkswagen to Tennessee, has been among the most vocal critics of the union drive.

Corker on Tuesday called the vote a “quickie election” because it wasn’t announced until last week and said the UAW had stacked the balloting in its favor by heavily lobbying labor interests at the company’s headquarters in Wolfsburg, Germany, over the preferences of local managers.

The senator declined to speculate on litigation that might be filed in the event of a UAW victory, though he did suggest that it’s unclear whether the company can establish a works council, even with the participation of a union.

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