You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Features

  • An early pardon for some local fowl
      FORT RECOVERY, Ohio – After walking through the latched gate and standing in 2-inch-deep wood shavings interspersed with feathers and turkey poop inside a tiny red barn that is home for 15 extremely large birds, I realized
  • Pardon their feathers
    FORT RECOVERY, Ohio – After walking through the latched gate and standing in 2-inch-deep wood shavings interspersed with feathers and turkey poop inside a tiny red barn that is home for 15 extremely large birds, I realized that this
  • Are you ready for snow days?
    If you want to get technical about it, winter doesn’t officially begin until Dec. 21.But Mother Nature doesn’t care about the calendar, having little regard for anything “official.
Advertisement
Washington Post
Tilapia is a good starter variety for people looking to get into fish.

Get more fish on your table

Eating more seafood can be a key to a healthful diet. But it also can seem easier said than done. The hurdles? The people you cook for, and with, might not like fish. You might not know how to cook it. The cost can be daunting, and environmental questions can be confusing. Thankfully, each obstacle can be overcome.

For the fish-phobic: Start with mild, white-fleshed fish, such as tilapia, cod and sole. Avoid the oily choices with darker flesh, such as mackerel and bluefish. Dark-fleshed fish have more healthful omega-3 fatty acids, but they’re an acquired taste. Mild fish, meanwhile, can take on the flavor of whatever spices, seasonings and sauces you desire, and they absorb marinades in minutes.

For the novice: Overcooking can render a delicate fillet tough and unappealingly fishy, and it can happen in a flash because fish cooks so quickly – but that’s also one of its best qualities. Your job is to keep an eye on it. Quickly pan-fry thin fillets, browning them on each side until just opaque. Finish larger, thicker pieces in the oven or on the stove top in a vibrant broth or stew.

For the budget-minded: Shop wisely, control portion sizes and extend the seafood with other ingredients. Mix a handful of shrimp with vegetables, pastas, grains or beans. If the fish is particularly pricey, remember: A mere pound can yield four servings. Shop for sales, get to know your fishmonger and don’t forget cold storage. Mild fish takes particularly well to freezing, so you can buy when the price is right, with no pressure to cook it right away.

For the environmentally conscious: Turn to such sources as the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch Program and the Blue Ocean Institute, both of which use color-coded rankings online to help you make smart choices. (The Natural Resources Defense Council, meanwhile, can help you identify fish that are low in mercury.)

– Stephanie Witt Sedgwick, Washington Post

Advertisement