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Banned carry-ons get into Russia

– Despite a temporary Russian ban on liquids in carry-on luggage, some air travelers heading to the Sochi Olympics through Moscow have brought toothpaste and other toiletries past security checkpoints without any problems.

Security concerns ahead of the Sochi Games were renewed after the U.S. Homeland Security Department warned airlines flying to Russia that terrorists may try to smuggle explosives into the country in toothpaste tubes. Thursday, Delta Air Lines revealed that the department is banning all liquids from carry-on luggage for nonstop flights from the U.S. to Russia.

Yet six Associated Press employees arriving in Moscow from across the world or beginning their journey there passed through security without having to remove toothpaste, hand lotion or water bottles from their carry-on luggage.

Another AP journalist, arriving in Moscow from Singapore, said a security official checked his deodorant and then returned it but didn’t notice or make mention of a small tube of toothpaste.

“It was pretty chill. I had an empty 1 1/2 -liter water bottle because I was hoping to fill it up on the plane, but no one checked it,” said Matt Segal, an Australian tourist who traveled from Moscow to Sochi on Thursday. “No one has pulled it out and asked about it.”

The no-liquids rule applies to anyone departing from a Russian airport, including transit passengers, said Russian Transport Ministry spokeswoman Nataliya Nesterova. She said it was up to airports to make sure it is enforced.

The seemingly sporadic enforcement underscores the difficulty that governments face in ensuring that airport personnel in many places, screening thousands of impatient people in a compressed period of time, maintain consistent practices as they try to prevent attacks that could be both human and public-relations disasters.

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