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Associated Press
This undated photo provided by Heritage Auctions shows autographs by The Beatles on a 4-foot-by-2-foot section of a backdrop wall from the New York theater where The Ed Sullivan Show theater took place. (AP Photo/Heritage Auctions)

Ed Sullivan Beatles' item headed to NYC auction

Associated Press
Between the group's sets during their historic television appearance Feb. 9, 1964, the four Beatles penned their autographs and drew caricatures at the urging of a stagehand. (AP Photo/Heritage Auctions)
Associated Press
Now that artifact, believed to be the largest Beatles autograph, is being sold on April 26, 2014, by Heritage Auctions in New York where it could realize $800,000 to $1 million. (AP Photo/Heritage Auctions)

– A large piece of stage backdrop autographed by the Beatles during their first live U.S. concert 50 years ago is coming to a NYC auction. It could be sold for between $800,000 and $1 million.

Face caricatures accompany the signatures that the Fab Four penned between sets of their historic Ed Sullivan appearance on Feb. 9, 1964. The Beatles opened the show with "All My Loving" in front of 700 screeching fans and 73 million television viewers.

A stagehand working that night is responsible for getting them to sign it. Eighty-one-year-old Jerry Gort of Calabasas, Calif., says "It was a spur of the moment thing."

The current owner of the 4-foot-by-2-foot plastic wall section is Andy Geller. He's a longtime Beatles collector and television and film voice-over artist.

Dallas-based Heritage Auctions is selling it April 26.

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