You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Business

  • Oil prices slide, despite Mideast chaos
    The price of oil fell for the ninth consecutive day Wednesday as global supplies continue to flow despite unrest in the world’s most important oil-producing region.The prolonged drop could lead to lower gasoline prices for U.S.
  • Summer box office suffers
    Hollywood’s summer at the box office isn’t just missing nearly 20 percent of last summer’s revenue. It’s lacking swagger.
  • Biomet’s earnings rebound
    Biomet Inc. on Wednesday reported preliminary fourth-quarter and full-year earnings for fiscal 2014, reflecting the Warsaw orthopedics company’s most profitable performance in years.Biomet reported annual earnings of $36.
Advertisement
Associated Press
Cyber-security experts now say that the massive data breach that hit Target appears broad and sophisticated.

Shoppers leery of emails

Target’s efforts to lessen breach seem to backfire

– An email sent to the roughly 70 million Target customers who may have been affected by a pre-Christmas data breach is causing panic among those who fear it could be an attempt to victimize them again.

Target says the email, which offers free credit monitoring services to potential victims of the breach, is legitimate. But the company has identified a handful of scammers who are trying to take advantage of the public’s fear and confusion.

Shawn Blakeman, 42, of Raleigh, N.C., received Target’s email, but he didn’t click on the link it contained “just in case it was some kind of a website that I couldn’t get out of or had a hidden virus,” he says.

Consumers have been on edge since news of the data breach broke last month. And they’ve been warned to be on alert for possible follow-up attacks that could come in the form of phishing emails, electronic messages designed to implant malicious software on their computers or draw them to websites that prompt them to enter personal information.

So when Target’s email began circulating earlier this week, many recipients questioned its authenticity. The email was especially suspicious to people who say they haven’t set foot in a Target store in years.

Jim Reid, 60, of Minneapolis says he was a little nervous about clicking on the link in the email and he questioned whether it was a good idea to send Target even more personal information when they were unable to protect it in the first place.

“There’s too much uncertainty,” he said. “They keep changing what they’re saying about how many people were affected, about what kinds of information were stolen. It’s obvious that they really don’t know.”

According to Target, hackers stole data related to 40 million credit and debit card accounts and also pilfered personal information, including email addresses, phone numbers, home addresses and names of as many as 70 million customers.

A company spokeswoman said it’s those 70 million people that Target contacted by email.

And while Target believes the theft of the roughly 40 million debit and credit card numbers only affected cards swiped between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15, the 70 million people whose personal information was stolen could have last shopped at a Target store months, or even years, ago.

Advertisement