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By Samuel Hoffman
Linda Scribner, of the League for the Blind and Disabled, demonstrates the new GW Micro and Microsoft Initiative, Windows-Eyes, Tuesday at the League. The Software download allows users of Microsoft Office 2010 and later versions to, at no cost, have full access to Windows PCs.

GW Micro helps blind access Microsoft Office

By Samuel Hoffman
Linda Scribner, of the League for the Blind and Disabled, demonstrates the new GW Micro and Microsoft Initiative, Windows-Eyes, Tuesday at the League. The Software download allows users of Microsoft Office 2010 and later versions to, at no cost, have full access to Windows PCs.

A Fort Wayne adaptive technology company has inked a deal with Microsoft Corp. that promises to make the software firm's applications free for the blind.

GW Micro Inc. on Tuesday announced the partnership that gives blind and visually-impaired individuals access to Microsoft Office. Terms of the licensing agreement were undisclosed.

"People like myself are finally able to get access to jobs they didn't have access to in the past," said Jeremy Curry, director of training at GW Micro, who is blind.

The company's Window-Eyes system permits visually impaired people to use the keyboard to navigate on a laptop computer or PC. Voice commands direct them while they use email, the Internet, Microsoft applications or other programs.

For more on this story, see Wednesday's print edition of The Journal Gazette or return to www.journalgazette.net after 3 a.m. Wednesday.

pwyche@jg.net

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