You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

In-Depth

  • Immigrants fill aging void
    If not for the wave of immigration last decade, some Indiana metropolitan areas would not have grown and others would have seen greater population losses, according to a recent study.
Advertisement
Victim 1

Ryan Dwayne Turner

Turner

When the grief of her loss becomes too much, Christina Rothgeb returns to the place her beloved boyfriend treasured – his aunt's home in Alabama.

"I can go in the house and see him talking to his aunt while he was cooking – just standing there talking to her," Rothgeb said.

Ryan Dwayne Turner, 45, who was suffering from a gunshot wound, walked to the Sunoco gas station at Hanna and Lewis streets about 9 p.m. Jan. 11, 2013, and was later taken to the hospital where he died.

That night, Rothgeb lost her third loved one in just a little more than a month.

It was Turner who was there to hold her when her son Paul Ward III and her nephew Jeremy Walker, both 22, were gunned down in December 2012.

"He never left my side on any of that," she said.

Rothgeb and Turner met when they were young, but it was several years later when their friendship blossomed into a relationship.

"I got to know him from within and I think that's what really made me start to like him," Rothgeb said.

His spirit and the many memories they shared is what keeps Rothgeb from giving up, she said.

"Even though Ryan's gone, I still try to do the things that me and Ryan used to do," she said. "That's where I find my comfort, in doing things that we used to love to do together."

According to Fort Wayne police officials, the shooting remains under investigation.

Near the anniversary of Turner's death, Rothgeb planned a candlelight vigil for Turner, not unlike the one she held for her son after the one-year mark of his death.

It's her way of keeping his memory alive.

"I'm going to do it until the day I die," she said.

jcrothers@jg.net

Advertisement