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Associated Press
Caroline Ramirez, left, and Sam Martinez use computers at BiblioTech, a first-of-its-kind, digital-only public library in San Antonio.

Texas sees new way to read

1st digital-only public library attracts interest

– Texas has seen the future of the public library, and it looks a lot like an Apple Store: Rows of glossy iMacs beckon. IPads mounted on a tangerine-colored bar invite readers. And hundreds of other tablets stand ready for checkout to anyone with a borrowing card.

Even the librarians imitate Apple’s dress code, wearing matching shirts and that standard-bearer of geek-chic, the hoodie. But this $2.3 million library might be most notable for what it does not have – any actual books.

That makes Bexar County’s BiblioTech the nation’s only bookless public library, a distinction that has attracted scores of digital bookworms, plus emissaries from as far away as Hong Kong who want to learn about the idea and possibly take it home.

“I told our people that you need to take a look at this. This is the future,” said Mary Graham, vice president of South Carolina’s Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce. “If you’re going to be building new library facilities, this is what you need to be doing.”

All-digital libraries have been on college campuses for years. But Bexar County, which runs no other libraries, made history when it decided to open BiblioTech. It is the first bookless public library system in the country, according to information gathered by the American Library Association.

Similar proposals in other communities have been met with doubts. In California, the city of Newport Beach floated the concept of a bookless branch in 2011 until a backlash put stacks back in the plan. Nearly a decade earlier in Arizona, the Tucson-Pima library system opened an all-digital branch, but residents who said they wanted books ultimately got their way.

Graham toured BiblioTech in the fall and is pushing Charleston leaders for a bond measure in 2014 to fund a similar concept, right down to the same hip aesthetic reminiscent of Apple.

San Antonio is the nation’s seventh-largest city but ranks 60th in literacy, according to census figures. In the early 2000s, community leaders in BiblioTech’s neighborhood railed about not even having a nearby bookstore, said Laura Cole, BiblioTech’s project coordinator.

A decade later, Cole said, most families in the area still don’t have Wi-Fi.

“How do you advance literacy with so few resources available?” she said.

Residents are taking advantage now. The library is on pace to surpass 100,000 visitors in its first year.

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