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GED test overhauled; Indiana among states opting for new exam

– The GED test, for decades the brand name for the high school equivalency exam, is about to undergo some changes.

Today, an upgraded GED exam and two new competing equivalency tests offered in several states will usher in a new era in adult education testing.

The General Educational Development exam was created in 1942 to help World War II veterans who had dropped out of high school use college benefits offered under the GI Bill. This will be its first facelift in more than a decade.

The revamped test is intended to be more rigorous and better aligned with the skills needed for college and today’s workplaces. The new test will be offered only on a computer, and it will cost more. What consumers pay for the test varies widely and depends on state assistance and other factors.

Even before its launch, officials in many states have balked at the cost increase and at doing away with paper-and-pencil testing.

Indiana and at least eight other states – New York, New Hampshire, Missouri, Iowa, Montana, Louisiana, Maine and West Virginia – severed ties with the GED test and adopted one of the two new tests that are entering the market.

Three states – Wyoming, New Jersey and Nevada – will offer all three tests. Tennessee will offer the GED test and one of the new tests; other states are expected to decide what to do in the coming months.

That will leave test takers, adult educators and states grappling with new questions: How do you best prepare students for the tests? Which tests is best, by price and quality? How will the tests be accepted by the military, employers and colleges?

The advent of new tests has sent thousands of test takers rushing to complete sections of the old test that they had left incomplete. Once the upgrade happens, the old scores of “partial passers” will no longer be accepted.

Marty Finsterbusch, president of ValueUSA, a resource organization for adult learners, said he fears there will be a lot of unintended consequences, and he’s worried about adult learners “getting caught up in the crunch of this.”

For example, he said, he wonders what will happen to someone who partially passes a test in one state, then moves to another state that doesn’t offer that type of exam.

“The system will work itself out eventually, but how many people are going to get hurt in the meantime?” Finsterbusch said.

More than 700,000 people took the GED test in 2012. The average test taker is about 26, and many people seeking a high school equivalency diploma are poor. Nationally, about 40 million American adults lack a high school education.

The GED test has been owned by the nonprofit American Council on Education since its inception.

Molly Corbett Broad, president of ACE, said that when it became clear a new test was needed, she wanted it to include materials that would help test takers better prepare for the exam and get linked to resources that would help them plan.

To do that, ACE enlisted a partner, the for-profit company Pearson Vue Testing. The new test can make results available quickly and can collect data that will help teachers better understand how their students did on the exam, so teaching can be adjusted.

The changes to the GED test opened the door for states to begin looking for alternatives, and two vendors responded.

One was Educational Testing Service, a nonprofit organization that also administers the Graduate Record Examination. It developed a high school equivalency exam called the High School Equivalency Test, or HiSET.

The other was CTB/McGraw-Hill, a for-profit company that is helping states develop assessments of Common Core standards, which put an emphasis on critical thinking and spell out what reading and math skills students should have at each level. It developed a high school equivalency test called the Test Assessing Secondary Completion, or TASC.

Both say they offer a quality test at a lower price.

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