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Associated Press
AMC Theaters execs, from left, Gerry Lopez, Elizabeth Frank and Craig Ramsay wait for their company’s initial public offering Dec. 18 on the New York Stock Exchange.

Markets navigate stormy seas of ’13

– The stock market was unstoppable in 2013.

A U.S. government shutdown, fear of a default, the threat of military action in Syria, big budget cuts and a European country looking for a bailout – any number of events might have derailed the stock market.

But they didn’t.

And if skittish investors jumped out of stocks, they lost out.

“2013 would have been good year to wear noise-canceling headphones,” said Dean Junkans, chief investment officer for Wells Fargo Private Bank. “There were a lot of things that happened, and the market kept moving higher.”

The Standard & Poor’s 500 was poised to have its best year since 1997. It was up 29.4 percent as of 12:48 p.m. Eastern time Tuesday. The Dow Jones industrial average was also on track for a stellar performance: It was up 26.3 percent, its best gain since 1995.

Instead of worrying about the wider world, investors focused on the Federal Reserve and the outlook for its stimulus program.

The Fed bought $85 billion in government bonds each month in 2013. The purchases were designed to hold down long-term borrowing rates and encourage spending and investment. The stimulus also prodded investors to move from low-yielding bonds to stocks.

Investors reacted to every twist and turn of the program’s fate. They sold stocks in the spring and summer over fears that the central bank would slow its bond-buying prematurely. They worried that every bit of good economic news signaled the end of support.

But in December, as hiring grew consistently stronger, investors were confident enough in the economy that they reacted positively when Fed officials finally decided to dial back purchases. The Fed also reassured the market by signaling it would keep short-term rates near zero. The stock market, which hovered below all-time highs, returned to record territory.

Of course, it wasn’t all about the Fed. U.S. corporate earnings rose for a fourth consecutive year. Total earnings for S&P 500 companies in 2013 are forecast to increase 5.37 percent, to a record $109.03 a share, according to data from S&P Capital IQ.

“It’s tough to argue that companies are in anything other than good health,” said Paul Atkinson, head of North American equities at Aberdeen Asset Management, a global fund management company that oversees about $3 billion.

Investors, emboldened by the Fed’s support and low inflation, were willing to pay more for those earnings. The price-earnings ratio for the S&P 500 index, a measure of earnings compared to stock prices, rose to 15.4 from 12.6 at the start of 2013, according to FactSet data.

By that measure, stocks grew more expensive but aren’t necessarily overvalued. The P/E ratio remained below its 20-year average of 16.5.

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