You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

World

  • Magnitude 7.5 earthquake hits Mexico
    MEXICO CITY – A powerful earthquake shook central and southern Mexico on Friday. The U.S. Geological Survey calculated its magnitude at 7.
  • Filipino devotees re-enact crucifixion of Christ
    Devotees in northern Philippine villages had themselves nailed to wooded crosses to re-enact the crucifixion of Jesus Christ as thousands of local and foreign spectators watched the bloody annual rites to mark Good Friday in Asia’s
  • Christians mark Good Friday in the Holy Land
    Christians in the Holy Land are commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus Christ in Good Friday prayers and processions through Jerusalem's Old City.
Advertisement
Also
Snowden to address Brits with a holiday message
LONDON – Britain’s Channel 4 says National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden will speak directly to Britain in its annual “Alternative Christmas Message,” a slot typically reserved for provocative or offbeat addresses.
The TV channel said Tuesday the appearance would be Snowden’s first television broadcast since he arrived in Moscow, where he has been granted temporary asylum after his exposure of the NSA’s secret domestic surveillance apparatus. Snowden’s revelations have prompted a global debate over the limits of surveillance and the value of privacy.
The queen delivers Britain’s “Royal Christmas Message,” but Channel 4 has used its parody version to give a platform to people as diverse as Iran’s then-President Mahmoud Ahmedinejad in 2008, and fictional characters including Ali G. and Marge Simpson in 1999 and 2004 respectively.

Snowden says aim met with US review

NSA policy abuses exposed, he insists

Snowden

– After six months during which he was rarely heard from except through the documents he leaked, fugitive former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden says his “mission’s already accomplished” after leaking NSA secrets that have caused a reassessment of U.S. surveillance policies.

Snowden told The Washington Post in an interview published online Monday night that he was satisfied because journalists have been able to tell the story of the government’s collection of bulk Internet and phone records, an activity that has grown dramatically in the decade since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

“For me, in terms of personal satisfaction, the mission’s already accomplished,” he said. “I already won.”

“As soon as the journalists were able to work, everything that I had been trying to do was validated,” Snowden told the Post. “Because, remember, I didn’t want to change society. I wanted to give society a chance to determine if it should change itself.”

NSA spokeswoman Vanee Vines offered no comment on the interview Tuesday, nor did the State Department. White House spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden said via email Tuesday: “Mr. Snowden faces felony charges here in the United States and should be returned to the U.S. as soon as possible, where he will be afforded … all the protections of our criminal justice system.”

President Barack Obama hinted Friday that he would consider some changes to NSA’s bulk collection of Americans’ phone records to address the public’s concern about privacy. His comments came in a week in which a federal judge declared the NSA’s collection program probably was unconstitutional. A presidential advisory panel has suggested 46 changes to NSA operations.

Snowden was interviewed in Moscow over two days by Post reporter Barton Gellman. The interview was conducted six months after Snowden’s revelations first appeared in the Post and Britain’s Guardian newspaper.

Gellman described Snowden as relaxed and animated over two days of nearly unbroken conversation, fueled by burgers, pasta, ice cream and Russian pastry.

In June, the Justice Department unsealed a criminal complaint charging Snowden, a former NSA contractor, with espionage and felony theft of government property. Russia granted him temporary asylum.

The effects of Snowden’s revelations have been evident in the courts, Congress, Silicon Valley and capitals around the world, where even U.S. allies have reacted angrily to reports of U.S. monitoring of their leaders’ cellphone calls.

Brazil and members of the European Union are considering ways to better protect their data and U.S. technology companies such as Google, Microsoft and Yahoo are looking at ways to block the collection of data by the government.

Snowden, 30, said he is not being disloyal to the U.S. or to his former employer.

“I am not trying to bring down the NSA; I am working to improve the NSA,” he said. “I am still working for the NSA right now. They are the only ones who don’t realize it.”

Advertisement