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Asian nations see teens excel on test; US lags

– Teens from Asian nations dominated a global test given to 15-year-olds, while U.S. students showed little improvement and failed to reach the top 20 in math, science or reading, according to test results released today.

American students scored below the international average in math and about average in science and reading.

The top average scores in each subject came from Shanghai, China’s largest city with more than 20 million people. Singapore, South Korea, Japan, and Hong Kong were among the participants with students scoring at the top on average in each subject. Vietnam, which had its students participate for the first time, had a higher average score in math and science than the United States.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan called the results a “picture of educational stagnation.”

“We must invest in early education, raise academic standards, make college affordable, and do more to recruit and retain top-notch educators,” Duncan said.

About half a million students in 65 nations and educational systems took part in the 2012 Program for International Student Assessment, or PISA, which is coordinated by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, or OECD, which is based in Paris.

Most results come from a sampling of scores from countries as a whole, but in China it was given in select regions. The Education Department’s National Center for Education Statistics released the results.

The test, which is given every three years to 15-year-olds, is designed to assess how students use what they’ve learned inside and outside of school to solve problems.

U.S. scores on the PISA haven’t changed much since testing started in 2000, even as students in countries such as Ireland and Poland have shown improvement and have surpassed U.S. students.

Shanghai students also topped the PISA test in 2009. Tom Loveless, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, said the school system in Shanghai is not equitable and the students tested are children of the elite because they are the ones allowed to attend municipal schools because of restrictions such as those that keep many migrant children out.

“The Shanghai scores frankly to me are difficult to interpret,” Loveless said. “They are almost meaningless.”

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