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Associated Press
Afghan police stand guard outside of Kabul police headquarters, where an American adviser was killed on Monday.

Afghan policewoman kills US adviser

Female is first to carry out an insider attack

– An Afghan policewoman walked into a high-security compound in Kabul Monday and killed an American contractor with a single bullet to the chest, the first such shooting by a woman in a spate of insider attacks by Afghans against their foreign allies.

Afghan officials who provided details identified the attacker as police Sgt. Nargas, a mother of four with a clean record. The shooting was outside the police headquarters in a walled compound which houses the governor’s office, courts and a prison in the heart of the capital.

A police official said she was able to enter the compound armed because she was licensed to carry a weapon as a police officer.

The American, whose identity was not released, was a civilian adviser who worked with the NATO command. He was shot as he came out of a small shop, Kabul Gov. Abdul Jabar Taqwa said. The woman refused to explain her motive for her attack, he said.

The fact that a woman was behind the assault shocked some Afghans.

“I was very shaken when I heard the news,” said Nasrullah Sadeqizada, an independent member of Parliament. “This is the first female to carry out such an attack. It is very surprising and sad,” he added, calling for more careful screening of all candidates for the police force.

According to NATO, some 1,400 women were serving in the Afghan police force mid-year with 350 in the army – still a very small proportion of the 350,000 in both services. Such professions are still generally frowned upon in this conservative society but women have made significant gains in recent years.

This is in stark contrast to the repression they suffered under the former Taliban regime, which forced women to be virtual prisoners in their homes and severely punished them for even small infractions of the draconian codes.

NATO command said that while the investigation continued, there might be “some temporary, prudent measures put into place to reduce the exposure of our people.”

There have been more than 60 insider attacks this year against foreign military and civilian personnel. They represent another looming security issue as President Obama and Afghan President Hamid Karzai prepare to meet early next year to discuss the pullout of NATO troops from Afghanistan by 2014 and the size and nature of a residual force the United States will keep in the country.

Insider attacks have accelerated this year as NATO forces have speeded up efforts to train and advise Afghan security before the pullout.

The surge in such attacks is throwing doubt on the capability of Afghan security forces to take over from international troops and has further undermined public support in NATO countries.

It has also stoked suspicion among some NATO units of their Afghan counterparts, although others enjoy close working relations with Afghan military and police.

As such attacks mounted this year, U.S. insisted they were “isolated incidents” and withheld details.

An AP investigation showed that at least 63 coalition troops – mostly Americans – had been killed and more than 85 wounded in at least 46 insider attacks.

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